category : ‘Race Reports/Favorite Races’


AND NOW FOR SOMETHING NEW – SORT OF

05.06.2015
Calm before the 'storm' - 6:00am May 3, 2015

Calm before the ‘storm’ – 6:00am May 3, 2015

The past weekend was pretty fun and exciting. It was my first race of 2015 but more significantly (to me) my first the M70-74 age category. There is no stretch of logic to point out it was also my first half marathon run at the BMO Vancouver Marathon weekend. Apart from my own ‘firsts’ it was one of those races that just couldn’t have been much better. The day was near perfect and the half marathon course is a gem. I had no expectations of my own race, something I’ll explain in a bit, but was thrilled to see that one of Canada’s budding prospects in distance running, Rob Watson, won the Half Marathon, and did so going away. That was good, but the Olympic qualifying window is open with a standard of 2:12:50, and Rob is looking to make his first assault on the standard at the Ottawa Marathon on May 31. Vancouver was his set-up event for Ottawa. Of course, even if he does go under the standard, that only gets him into the ‘lottery’. There are at least three other gents named Wykes, Coolsaet and Gillis who may have something to say on the matter. Still, it looks like three will go and if Robbie can get himself under that standard the odds are pretty good, marathoning being what it is and all.

Ellie Greenwood wins Comrades 2014

Ellie Greenwood wins Comrades 2014

Another friend I watched lay down a marker is Ellie Greenwood. Miss Ellie doing well in a race is not really remarkable. She won the Vancouver Marathon a couple of years back, so what is exciting about her Third Place on Sunday? Well, locals in the Vancouver running community as well as her fellow ultra-runners know she suffered a badly broken hand in a bike/car confrontation recently. She was on the bike. She lost. Her medical team forbade running for several weeks. Ellie is the defending champion at Comrades. Ellie was training for her defense of title come May 31. Then BOOM (literally), her training was trashed with the accident. Not only did they say no running but they didn’t want her doing anything physical. Must have been harder on her than the injury itself! So, one might now be able to see how a third place finish in a time of 2:47 and change (only about 5 minutes shy of her marathon PB) was a big result for her. Competition at Comrades is pretty fierce. There is no saying she was going to prevail with or without the accident getting in the way, but for those of us who know her amazing spirit and physical abilities, her day on the roads of Vancouver was ever so encouraging. Go Ellie!

How can all of this have anything to do with “NEW”, as the title suggests? Well, we are getting to that part right now.

My family has been on me a bit to knock it off with the marathons. At the very least, maybe not run quite so many. There is some sense to that. Having just entered my eighth decade, the strain of a lot of hard running is making itself felt. Oh, I’m not about to fall over and I CAN still do a full marathon training program, but if it ever was, it is not so easy these days. When you come right down to it, if you are competitive of spirit, you will always train to your potential (ie hard) and the finish times are just relative if they are the best you can do at the time. I am a little bit tempted to let marathons go, having run 25 and my last one having been fun and pretty satisfying as far as performance goes. I do not want my last one to be an awful experience, so running another one creates that risk. It is also highly probable that if the right opportunity comes along, I WILL run another one or two in the right place or time.

The solution has been to concentrate more on half marathons. My personal health situation has pushed in that direction for this year anyway. Not sure ‘health’ is the right term. I wrote a few weeks back about having cataract surgery and my new bionic eye! Like Ellie, though far less traumatically, that cost me three weeks of exercise at a critical moment in my Spring training schedule, meaning that even Vancouver was a bit too soon re my preparations to race. The difference in my vision has been worth every bit of it, though. Now, I face a similar situation as surgery looms on the other eye. The good news is that the date got moved up a couple of weeks, so my Fall racing is going to be far less impacted. Hey, and I’ll be able to easily read my pace on my Garmin!

Marathon Maniac

Marathon Maniac

Now for the story on the half marathon. Because I seem to need goals, I decided that if I really wanted to change my focus to the half marathon, I should find a personal challenge. As many will know, I am a Marathon Maniac. I recently joined the Half Fanatics, which has similar goals and standards (but for half marathons), all of which are strictly about fun. BUT, people have long talked about being “Double Agents”, having a foot in each camp. The powers that be among the Maniacs and Fanatics decided to make that official and have now created an official Double Agent set of standards and levels. How could I resist? I am now DA#1261 and moving along on my quest to ‘climb mountains’ as the levels are designated by names of famous Mountains.

So, I am already a two star or Silver level Maniac, but partly because I have concentrated so much on marathons over the last year, I haven’t had the kind of string in the Half Fanatics system to be anything more than base level. (No, they won’t let you count marathons as being a half or more.) What to do? Well, chase down some Planets of course (HF levels are done as planets)!

The Vancouver Half Marathon was the first of four I intend to run in 14 days. I’m not sure that is exactly what the family had in mind, but it does involve/matter HOW you run. Let’s face it, if I was training for a marathon I might well run 27K, 30K, 33K for three weeks in a row. Of course they would be LSD pace. Fanatics only care that you start and finish, nobody ever asks ‘how fast?’. So, it works – for me anyway.

Hayward Field - The Finish is Nigh

Hayward Field – The Finish is Nigh

I do have one race in there that is a favourite and falls just where I may be able to do something decent re time and placement. That is the one coming up this Sunday (May 10). It is the Eugene Marathon (half). Love that event. I’ve done the marathon three times and back when I was a mere lad of 65 it gave me my recent marathon PB and a shocking 3rd Place in my group (out of a field of 16, no less). Age graded, that one came out as my second best ever! I’ve never run the Eugene Half, so on this my fourth time back to Eugene I will be giving it a go. I know the route well. Up to something around 10 miles the half and full use the exact same course. After crossing the Willamette River for the first time, the marathoners will go right and us half marathoners will go left with less than three miles back to the fabled track of Hayward Field. Gives me goose-bumps every time I run the straightaway to the finish.  I sure hope this isn’t going to jinx it, but Eugene is my target race.

Eugene Marathon - 2010 - Passing Hayward Field.

Eugene Marathon – 2010 – Passing Hayward Field.

Eugene should be a lot of fun. For reasons I don’t actually know, some 25 runners from the Forerunners Clinic group I run with, have decided they will do the half or full in Eugene. I know a few, like me, are shooting for a good time, maybe some BQ efforts even. (It is that kind of course.) There are definitely some PB aspirations.

Moving on, I was just surfing about the Half Fanatic race schedule for potential races when I fell upon the Sage Rat events in Prosser, WA on May 16-17. By the way, if you are ever searching for a Half to run, you can go to the HF web page and view the Race Schedule. It is public. You will find races from one end of the US to the other and most major Canadian races too. If an event is listed, there will be a link to the race site. Same is true for marathons over on the Maniac web site.

The whole Sage Rat thing just grabbed my imagination. Prosser is not a ridiculous distance from here and the event looked like great fun. Saturday there is the Sage Rat Half Marathon. That one is a pretty standard ‘road race’ and there are some shorter alternate distance races too. On Sunday there is the Dirty Rat 25K ‘trail’ event. Might be some trails, but it seems more like back roads and a gnarly 1,000ft elevation gain/loss on an out and back. Talk about medals! You get one for each race, then one for doing the combo. Do well, and you might even get some age group recognition. I have a pretty good chance of being first out of ONE in both races. The Fanatics count actual half marathons and anything longer than a half, as long as it is shorter than a marathon. So, this will be my first ‘back to back’. Naturally, both the Sage Rat and Dirty Rat are going to be all about the fun and I hope to find folks of similar pace to run with and chat. Being the third and fourth ‘half marathons’ in 14-15 days AND back to back, I definitely won’t be pushing too hard.

All going well and by the time this is all said and run, I should have climbed to the Fourth Level of Half Fanatic (Jupiter). I’m sure that will also do something for my Double Agent status, but that will be what it will be and I’m not just sure how you combine a two star Maniac status with a four planet Fanatic status to get the corresponding Double Agent status (maybe Mont Blanc?), but we’ll see! Some might figure I should be called “IDIOT” (vs Fanatic) but you must know I’m not alone! There are over 11,000 members in each of the MM and HF groups. We DA’s are special though, with numbers only around 1500 at the moment. That said the group is only a week old, and now that it exists there may be interest in getting qualified as either HF or MM in order to be a Double Agent.

First things first, I am pretty excited about visiting Eugene again. For me, it is ‘one of those races’ that is special. It will not be lost on me as we turn for home after crossing the Willamette River, we will be paralleling and very near “Pre’s Trail” and when we hit the track of Hayward Field, we WILL be “Running in the Footsteps of Legends”!

BMO Vancouver Marathon (and this Blogger) Ready to GO!

05.02.2015

BMO Van Mar Logo0001Well, I registered a long time ago. I went to the media luncheon and met the elites in all events and then I picked up my race package (half marathon for me this year). I laid out my race kit. My shoes and everything else match like seldom before!

THERE IS NOTHING LEFT TO DO BUT RUN!!

Well, OK, guess I have to wait until they fire the starting gun, horn, whistle (?). And, I might have to wander around and look for some running friends. Of course I will have to search out Team Joshua the subject of my last blog post. Then, there will be nothing left to do but run.

The weather is looking pretty ideal, especially for the half marathon and probably for elite marathoners. It might get warmish (certainly not hot) for marathoners taking a bit longer to go the distance. Don’t forget your sunscreen!

I ran the Half in 2012 (first year of the new courses) and the Full Marathon in 2014. While I am local and know the routes quite well, you don’t REALLY know them unless you run them. So, I can say I do know both the Half Marathon and Marathon courses. “Like” is another thing. I might go so far as to say I Love the Half Marathon route, at least the territory you pass through. The Marathon covers some of the same ground in the second half and has some of its own amazing features too. That said, if you are reading this and looking for clues, the marathon route is not the easiest you will ever do. My best advice is study the course and pay close attention to the elevation profile and where in the race the challenges come. I think Respect is the best advice I can give. Show it respect and you should do OK, maybe even well.

Cambie Street - March 2012

Cambie Street – March 2012

When it comes to the Half, there are fewer challenges, but one of the big temptations will be to run down Cambie Street like you were after a 5K PB. Don’t do that. Oh, it will be fun, at first. It may come back to haunt you a bit later in the race! Moderation may be the big word for the Half. With the weather expected, you will be treated to an amazing view of the downtown and the North Shore mountains all the way down to the bridge. It could truly be spectacular, especially if you are a visitor or even a first time in this event. Then you will be treated to a corner of Vancouver’s China Town and a romp through the ‘new-old’ Yaletown area until the route puts along the English Bay shore prior to entering the City’s jewel, Stanley Park. Marathoners actually go all the way around on the Seawall. Half Marathoners stay on the road and cut over into the middle of the park, running through to the other side, where a very hard right turn (think switch-back) will be the beginning of the end. Don’t get too excited. There is still a way to, but you are definitely into the last phases. You are more or less running East at this point to Brockton Point, then turning to

Harry Jerome - Stanley Park, Vancouver, BC

Harry Jerome – Stanley Park, Vancouver, BC

the right past the “Nine O’clock Gun” and my old friend, Harry Jerome. If you are needing some inspiration at that point (you very well might), he’s your man (or statue). For Half Marathoners (still on the road), look left, marathoners (on the Seawall path) look right. It will be right about here that you need to start considering how you will finish. No, you aren’t there yet, but it won’t be a lot more than 2K from this point.

The two routes come together just near the Vancouver Rowing Club and everybody is on the Seawall. Of course, because of the big stagger in the starts of the two events, there won’t be many half marathoners out there when the elite marathoners come through. That should be around 10:30am, give or take. So, half marathoners will be three and a half hours into their race at that point. The final or home stretch is along Georgia and up (a little) Pender to the Finish Line. You should be able to see it once you veer onto Pender. Get ready to celebrate, because the work will be almost over and the fun getting ready to start!

Here is to a wonderful race day for everyone from the 8K to the Half Marathon to the Full. And remember, stay safe – have fun! Should be lots of spectators on such a great day! Smile (when you can) and don’t forget to thank a volunteer!  Maybe a bunch of volunteers! Without them, we wouldn’t be doing this.

Finally, if you happen to spot/recognize this old buzzard out there, say hi!

TEAM JOSHUA ROLLS AGAIN AT BMO VANCOUVER, AND OTHER BIG NEWS

04.30.2015

IMG_3662

If his was a new story it might be easier to write in a way, but it is an amazing story so I guess I am going to to go with that. The simplest part of this story today is that Team Joshua will be running the BMO Vancouver Half Marathon on Sunday May, 3. I am also running the Half so will be catching up with Team Joshua on Sunday morning at the start. This is the fifth time Team Joshua will compete at the BMO Vancouver Marathon events, beginning with the full marathon in 2009, followed by four half marathons including the one coming up on Sunday.

The Vancouver running community is,  or certainly should be, aware of Team Joshua. That would be Michelle Gentis and her young(ish) and now not so very little son, Joshua. Josh is now 14 years of age and a lot bigger than the first time I met him back in 2012 or when they started in 2008. I know some members of our community are aware as we have collectively supported Team Joshua along their journey. There was a RITZ Blog piece a while back that included a segment about a fund-raising event that helped realize a custom racing chair for Josh. This is one of the things I love about the running community – so much support and understanding for everyone who wants to be a part of it. But, I’m getting a bit ahead of myself.

I should also say I am not the only one to have written about or covered the story of Team Joshua. Check this Impact story written by Jean Sorenson, another Vancouver runner/writer. For that matter, Team Joshua has a web site that you can find pretty easily, especially if you just click the link included right here. Among other things, you will find a number of media links that tell various parts of this moving story. Still, the story evolves and there is always more to be said and to be inspired by.

Scotiabank Vancouver Half Marathon - 2008

Scotiabank Vancouver Half Marathon – 2008

Not that it would make much difference if it had a name, but Josh has an undiagnosed brain disorder. He is effectively immobile without aid and unable to speak. This is not a new story in that Michelle and Josh began running in 2008 at the Scotiabank Vancouver Half Marathon. As the story has gone, one thing has led to another because this is one big thing that gives Josh such obvious pleasure and Michelle both satisfaction and her own pleasure in being able to give Josh something so simple and good. In Michelle’s own words, when they finished Scotiabank in 2008, “he was squealing with delight”!

Image - Version 4

Team Joshua racing to a Boston Qualifier Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon (2013)

Back there a while, Michelle decided that being a pretty darn good runner, she would try to qualify them for Boston. Not many are unaware of Team Hoyt (Dick and son Rick). They were the inspiration for Team Joshua’s dream to qualify for and run the Boston Marathon. Although Team Joshua has had a lot of supporters along the way she has a special spot for Jerry Ziak of Forerunners. Jerry provided the coaching support that got Team Joshua to that all important BQ time.

Even though the qualifying time was done at The Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon, while pushing Josh’s racing chair, it turned out that NO competitor under the age of 18 is allowed in the Boston Marathon. I personally understand why no runner under 18 can run, but the runner is clearly well over the age of 18! Apparently, there is still some small amount of conversation that continues on the subject, but for now this seems to be kind of a settled matter. And just in case you are wondering, there is no ‘special BQ’ if you are pushing a chair, racing or otherwise. BQ is a BQ – period. With good reason, Michelle worries that physics will make it pretty hard to BQ as Josh gets older and heavier and reaches the magic age of 18. I understand that Michelle’s racing weight is about 120lb. The ratio of she to he will soon be the opposite of what it was when Team Joshua began. Don’t care how good those bearings are, she will be pushing a weight WHILE trying to run a BQ.

Well, it seems that is what the Boston Athletics Association thinks – no entry for Team Joshua right now. I would offer them some unsolicited advice though: Save yourself some time and trouble on this and just give them the entry they earned. You’ll be glad you did. You may or may not have realized that as kind and lovely as Michelle may seem on the outside, inside you are dealing with the spirit of a Mama Grizzly Bear!

How do I know this? Well, Michelle already has a plan to put Boston at the back end of a rather impressive list of six fairly well known marathons: Chicago, New York City, Berlin, London, Tokyo and finally Boston. That’s right folks! Team Joshua is taking on the Marathon Majors, starting with Chicago. So tell me, when Team Joshua has completed five of six of the Majors, what are the good folks at BAA going to say then?

And HOW do I know this Marathon Majors project is going to go so terrifically? Well that is the “Big News” of the title. Just this week it was confirmed that the Bank of America Chicago Marathon has accepted Team Joshua for this year’s race. That didn’t happen without some effort either, but the Race Director, Carey Pinkowski, worked with his race team to review the earlier policy of NO WHEEL CHAIRS and will institute a trial program for this year including Team Joshua and five others. None of this is going to be inexpensive, so when Aon (Chicago) stepped up to sponsor the efforts of Team Joshua, things came together in a big way!

When writing about stuff like this, or any personal running story it is hard to know where to go, what to say, and for that matter what not to say.

Happy BQ Team

Happy BQ Team

Come Sunday, I hope that lots of runners will recognize Team Joshua, say ‘hi’ and maybe run along for a bit. I was thinking I might just run with them myself, but then I realized they would have to slow down so I can keep up! I am sure, from what Michelle tells me, that Josh is going to have a wonderful time out there and will once again love crossing the finish line and getting his finisher’s medal. Any of us who are around at the time will surely celebrate with Josh and Michelle. And then, we will go home. Team Joshua will go home too. The difference is that, as much fun as Sunday will be, Josh will still be, in Michelle’s words, “profoundly disabled”. They will go on with the rest of life, a life that has so many more challenges than having a racing chair that enables Michelle to move them quickly from start to finish.

When I personally met Josh, he was about ten. Now he is fourteen and moving into higher levels of learning. He is having difficulty with his school situation and it is apparently clear that it saddens him. Acceptance at age 14 is everything. Someone with the challenges Josh faces winds up in a category of his own. Part of what drives Michelle is this broader situation that faces Josh and all people with disabilities. While there is no doubt her cause is personal, she also wants to use it as a form of advocacy. She has told me that another inspiration is the Power to Push project of Shaun Evans (ultra runner) and his son Shamus (cerebral palsy) and their cross country run this summer to raise awareness.

Why shouldn’t people like Josh and Shamus have the pleasure of physical and other achievements? Maybe Josh doesn’t communicate like the rest of us, but I’ve seen him and trust me, Josh CAN communicate how he is feeling. Maybe he doesn’t actually run these races but his joy in participating is just as great, maybe more, as compared to the able bodied. Why shouldn’t he be able to feel this joy? Happily, and some of the time, running is just what the doctor ordered! But, it is more. It is symbolic of acceptance in life as a whole. Why just running? Why not everything in general? Oh, there is no doubt it might look different on the surface, but being fully involved is what counts.

Acceptance. That is what it is about. Acceptance. That is all Team Joshua is seeking.

START ‘EM YOUNG AT A RACE THAT CARES!

03.04.2015

And, by young, I mean shortly after conception!

IMG_2843

Resting after the ordeal!

No, I have not completely jumped the tracks. This is a true and fun story about our brand new grandson, Jonah. The whole family is pretty crazy about  running (and about Jonah at this particular moment in time), even if I am the only one ‘certifiable’ where it comes to the running (Marathon Maniac #6837). Our daughter Janna is the current top performer within our ‘clan’ where it comes to speed.  Although, since she is also Jonah’s Mom, she is on a bit of a hiatus for the moment. That said, the last race she ran was the Winnipeg Police Service Half Marathon. She did OK too, considering that she was kind of in the morning sickness phase of her pregnancy (21/153 in her age group, 338/1578 OA and in a time of 1:50:42).

Truth be told, she is probably not the only woman ever to run a race while ‘in the family way’. Still, I was impressed and decided as a fairly nutso runner that even if he was doing a ‘ride-along’ (hey, it was the Police Service race) Jonah was a finisher just like his Mom. Finishers get a finisher medal. A plan was hatched!

I contacted the Winnipeg Police Service Half Marathon officials and told them my story and asked if it was remotely possible to obtain a finisher medal from the 2014 event. They saw the story like I did and got right into it! They  sent me the medal I requested AND a wonderful pink plush pig for Jonah (which will likely be more appreciated by him in the short-term, than the medal). I had the wonderful opportunity to make the surprise presentation of the medal and official race pig when we arrived in Winnipeg to meet our newest family member! To say it was well received may just a bit of an understatement.

There is more to the story, but I want to stop right here and say how much we all appreciate this fabulous gesture from a race that really gets it. I’m not from Winnipeg and even if we did live in Morden, MB for a couple of years,  have never run this race. But, I am sure that any event that cares enough to help me out with my personal fun project, is a race to be run. Since we are going to be making regular visits to Winnipeg, it is sure on my ‘to do’ list to run the race. I mean, our daughter and grandson have done it, and I’m pretty sure our son-in-law ran it a couple of years ago. Maybe one day not too long from now, we can all do one of the events together. It won’t be this year as I am already committed to the BMO Vancouver Half Marathon on the same day, but I’d sure recommend the Winnipeg Police Service Half Marathon, Relay and 5K to anyone who is looking for a good event to do.

The 2015 Version is  on May 3 and will also include a 5K this time around. The 5K is a new addition to open the event to more people. It is all part of moving into the second decade of the event (2014 was the 10th running of the race). With the half marathon plus a two leg team-relay event and now the 5K, there is pretty much something for everyone where it comes to distance, 5K, 10K (sort of) and 21.1K.

Back to Jonah’s big debut race. I am given to understand that in due course, he will be receiving his finisher certificate and also understand he MAY have won the ‘under nine months’ category! Let’s face it, we had to wait until we knew his name before a certificate could be made. OK, I admit that winning the under 9 months category  may be a bit like me winning some races in the 70+ category (just not that much competition). But hey, it already gives us something in common!

There is a new family running project in the works. With any luck, sometime before too long,

Jonah and his Grandad

Jonah and his Grandad

Jonah and his Dad and Mom, our other grandson Charlie (he will be nine years old this summer), his Mom and Dad, the Grandad (that would be me) and the Nana will all be able to enter the same race and do it together! Why, we might even convince Uncle Cameron to come out of retirement for this! Charlie says he is up for a 5K and while Jonah seems enthusiastic enough (OK, so it might have been  gas that made him smile when I asked what he thought), he will probably have to take part in a baby jogger. The big trick is going to be getting everybody in the same place at the same time because we are scattered all over the place from Victoria to Winnipeg. If we can do it, you KNOW there will be a team shirt!

When I started writing this, we were actually in Winnipeg, meeting the newest family member! The morning when this photo was taken he was having a visit with his Grandad. I thought I was entertaining him with my witty commentary, but he fell asleep right there in my arms. Next thing though, his little legs started to go – I’m pretty sure he was having a running dream!!

END OF A YEAR, END OF AN ERA (FOR ME)

12.13.2014
Sunset on 2014 Running

Sunset on 2014 Running

It has been an interesting year, this 2014. That includes both personal and general matters. Seems that with my decision that racing is now over for me until 2015, a bit of a review is in order. I won’t say 2014 didn’t have its ups and downs and I’m not talking about course profiles. All in all though, I have to say it has been an overall great year. I hope others who may read this and are inspired to reflect on their 2014 race and running records will feel as I do. I am already looking forward to 2015, and if you read on, you will see why! I’ll wish all readers a great year in 2015, as it seems a logical conclusion coming out of a post like the one to follow.

Lenore and Bob Dolphin, April 4,2014

Lenore and Bob Dolphin, April 4,2014

To begin with the personal, I did a couple of ‘old friend’ events and several new ones. The first of those races was new to me (Yakima River Canyon Marathon) as was the second (Big Cottonwood Marathon). The other was just plain new (Rock ‘n’ Roll Vancouver Half Marathon), to me and everyone else. The latter event

Roger Robinson and Kathrine Switzer - Q&A Session

Roger Robinson and Kathrine Switzer – Q&A Session

also had a not so new 10K component, but given that the James Cunningham Seawall race was The James Cunningham Seawall race and not the James Cunningham Seawall 10K (because the Stanley Park Seawall isn’t exactly 10K – almost, but not quite), you could argue that technically, even it was new.

Yakima was a great opportunity to meet so many old friends in a celebration of running and the contributions of Team Dolphin, not to mention Bob Dolphin’s personal marathon records. Present were a number of Running in the Zone contributors with an appearance there of Roger Robinson and Kathrine Switzer, feature speakers. Marathon Maniacs abounded and a couple of milestone achievements were timed to happen at the Yakima River Canyon Marathon.

Running Down Big Cottonwood Canyon - My most recent marathon.

‘Flying’ Down Big Cottonwood Canyon

Big Cottonwood was a great race for me personally as I recaptured some feeling of accomplishment with my performance. I love running down big hills, note that of the eight times I’ve run Hood to Coast, something like five of those have been Leg #1. Big Cottonwood is like Leg 1, but is most of a full marathon (around 20 miles) of “Leg 1″! I came away happy with what I had done and fairly certain I could have done better had my original travel plan not got a bit altered due to an acting opportunity. I went from an easy driving trip covering a total of 9 days, to a hectic flight leaving Vancouver Friday morning and arriving about 4:00pm in Salt Lake City with just time to pick up the race package and get to the 7am start, then back home Sunday afternoon. The travel was not a huge deal, but I had no time to adjust to the altitude and no time to drive the course and really see that the ‘flat’ part coming just after 15 miles wasn’t, flat that is. Net zero elevation, because you start that segment and finish it in the same place. Whatever, I was very pleased and really thought the race was a good one.

BMO Vancouver Marathon - Start 2013

BMO Vancouver Marathon – Start 2013

The first ‘old faithful’ event in 2014 was the BMO Vancouver Marathon, and it too was sort of new. It was the fifth time I have run the Vancouver full marathon (on three different courses), but I had never run the recently set (2012) marathon route. Vancouver was my very first marathon, run in 1988, so we go way back, this race and me. I ran the new half marathon in the inaugural year, but since the two races share very little common ground, that didn’t help much in knowing the marathon course. I do have to admit that the Forerunners training clinic I run with and lead a pace group for, trains on most of the course at some point or other, but in bits and pieces. And, training runs aren’t the same thing anyway.

Three-fer at Victoria 2007 Danielle, Dan & Janna

Three-fer at Victoria 2007 Danielle, Dan & Janna

If there is something more familiar for me in the category of races I call ‘old friends’, than the Goodlife Fitness Victoria Marathon (and half marathon), I’m not sure what it would be. (No, the PRR “First Half” doesn’t count because I’m an organizer/facilitator of that one – never ran it.) Getting back to ‘Victoria’, a lot of the 11 total appearances were at the Royal Victoria Marathon and I sill kind of think of it that way. The Victoria Marathon holds a special place for me as it was my first marathon completed after back surgery, a full ten years after, but still the first. I ran it with some uncertainty and trepidation even if I had trained pretty well. Finishing and doing so decently was a momentous personal achievement and left me with a great love for the event. Well, and yes, ahem, it was where Running in the Zone: A Handbook for Seasoned Athletes was launched. The other great thing about Victoria is that it is our family race. Most of the times I have done Victoria it has been with one or both daughters running too.

On a very personal level, I need to note that 2014 is the end of a decade in my life. New age group coming up in January when I officially enter my EIGHTH decade! That sounds so much more impressive than just saying I will turn 70 in January. But, I got here and I’m still going. For a bunch of reasons, most of them having zip to do with running, the early part of the year will be short on racing. I’ll be running, just not racing until April or even May. With 10 races in 2014, that may be a good thing and set me up well for later in 2015. I’m tempted to get one in as soon as possible, just so  I can say I did a race when I was 70, but there is nothing making it look like I won’t have a chance to do one a bit later. Speaking of eras, the race that would have been my #1 candidate for first event in the new grouping is the Steveston Icebreaker, but we won’t be in Vancouver. Nope, we expect to be considerably farther east than that, meeting our newest grandchild. I am actively looking for a race to do with our older grandson, who will turn nine in 2015. That should work out OK. Not entirely certain I can hold out for a race with the new grandkiddly. Still, I do have friends running in their late 70s and even 80s, so who knows what may happen. I mean, it doesn’t need to be a marathon! I’ve run with all our kids and both sons-in-law (raced, that is), so time to start working on this new generation.

MC's First Half - Anjulie Latta and Dan Cumming

MC’s First Half – Anjulie Latta and Dan Cumming

There is a bit of minor surgery coming up after I get done with MC duties at the First Half Half Marathon, and I’m told I will be off running for about three weeks, so THAT is what takes things through into at least April before I can think seriously about racing or maybe that is think about racing seriously. I mean, when you are the young guy in a new age division, you better make hay while the sun shines!

Speaking of shining sun, I am just closing out my last couple of days in Jamaica, basking in the glow of the 2014 Reggae Marathon, Half Marathon & 10K, another event that has become one of my regulars. I took a few days off after the race, but then started an easy, early morning beach running program that has seen me do an easy 4-5K each morning, just as the sun is starting to rise into the sky. The beach is relatively quiet, except for a few other runners and some random guys who keep offering me ‘smoke’ and ‘herb’. Hope springs eternal, I guess. They don’t seem to see the irony of trying to get a runner to stop and light up. I don’t know much about the properties of ‘herb’, but I’m not sure it could make me feel a lot more relaxed and peaceful than these totally purposeless runs. By no purpose, I mean that I am not training and not racing. I used my Garmin once, just to get an idea of distance because pace is hard to gauge in the sand. Most of the beach is pretty flat and firm, so the running is easy and you just need to let everything sink into your being and enjoy the sound of the waves and the changing light. No purpose, means no real pace, just do what feels good and stop if there is something to look at. I’ve been running with shoes because more than once, I’ve done a bare-foot beach run and had the shifting sand give me a blister on the bottom of my foot. That in turn curtails the morning runs – kind of counter-productive you’d have to say. But, tomorrow is probably the last day for an early run. The next run is going to be barefoot, right near the water’s edge. I can feel it already!

Morning Beach Scene - Negril, JA

Morning Beach Scene – Negril, JA

IF I DON’T WRITE THIS WILL THE REGGAE PARTY CONTINUE?

12.09.2014
Rondel Restaurant - Copy

Chris at Rondel Restaurant for ‘last breakfast’.

Jetola Anderson-Blair models the all new 2014 medals

Jetola Anderson-Blair models the all new 2014 medals

You know, that is kind of how I have felt. But, as I bid farewell to Chris Morales (aka That Runnin’ Guy) yesterday, I knew the Reggae Marathon, Half Marathon & 10K was indeed over for 2014. Some years back Chris and I found ourselves staying at Rondel Village and have never found a reason to stay elsewhere. FWIW, Rondel just won the 2014 Best Small/Boutique Hotel award and if you want a local resort experience with all the essentials of clean, convenient, nice beach and fabulous staff without the ‘all-inclusive’ frills and vibe, well this is the place.

I am making a vacation of it, so as readers of earlier posts will know, I arrived early and will be staying for a little while yet.

This year’s Reggae Marathon showed that no matter how good an event may be, you can always step it up a notch. New finisher medals, new pasta party organization, new finish venue arrangements and my own personal favourite, five year age categories. Until 2014, they used 10-year categories. Call me shallow, but when you are the oldest (pretty sure I am) in a 10 year category, your hopes of a stellar placing diminishes. My birthday falls exactly one month after race day and at the point, even in a five-year age group, I will move to a new category, M70-74. Yes, I know, hard to believe. I mean I don’t believe it!!!! Five or ten, I’m still likely the oldest guy, but at least I don’t have to deal with those young 60-something whipper-snappers.

"Four Amigos" add to the Reggae Marathon total - now 18 races.

“Four Amigos” add to the Reggae Marathon total – now 18 races.

As some really faithful fans may recall, a bunch of us have created our own event within an event: The Reggae Runners Half Marathon Challenge (2014). This year the group grew to 10 from the original three. Being the guy who loves stats and age-grading, I was the keeper of the official results and ratings. It was interesting how many of us turned out to be in the last year of our 5-year groupings whatever they were. This whole thing and the on-line bantering, OK trash-talking, is part of our particular fun. It turned out, although I really don’t

Deb's a Winna!

Deb’s a Winna!

want to rehash the whole thing here or favour this one or that, one of our number, Deb Thomas won her age group AND was top Female Master in the Half Marathon. Another, and one who has contributed to this blog, Jetola Anderson-Blair won her category in the Full Marathon. One of our number felt a marathon wasn’t quite enough, so Navin Sadarangani decided to create his own 50K challenge by running 8K before the official marathon start and timing his arrival to join the official marathon race when the ‘gun’ went off.

Times (other than the all around ‘good times)’ don’t count so much here. The race is a lot of fun and well organized but you are running in a tropical climate and in that context some really good times are turned in, but they can’t be compared straight up to times a person might do in cooler regions. You are better to judge yourself against your peers in terms  of placement. On that basis, our crowd of enthusiastic runners did themselves proud with a total of 6 “top 10″ age group finishes in our chosen events.

It was so good to see Race Director, Alfred “Frano” Francis, back in the saddle, given that he was in a Kingston Hospital in intensive care this time last year. He gave a Big Up to the race crew who did themselves proud in his absence last year and rightly so. That is no easy task, even though everyone is so good at what they do. I hate to start naming names because I don’t KNOW all the names, but no tribute to the crew can go forth without a special nod to Diane Ellis.

2014 Start Line. Just before it all got going!

2014 Start Line. Just before it all got going!

I’m not going to recount the numbers. At the moment I don’t even know the official stats. Regardless, the 2014 Reggae Marathon was clearly bigger and better than ever before. As far as I know, the race went off without the proverbial hitch. Having been RD for a few events, I know there were likely a good many ‘hitches’ but it is a sign of great organization when only the insiders know!

So, even though I know my vacation is continuing, I guess I have to accept that Reggae Marathon 2014 is truly over. This old runner is glad he made the pilgrimage and so glad to see so many familiar faces once again, not to mention meeting a bunch of new ones.

I guess that just leaves on thing to say. See you all in 2015 for the 15th Reggae Marathon, Half Marathon and 10K! Negril, Jamaica – December 5, 2015

 

 

NEWS FROM THE ISLAND IN THE SUN

12.04.2014

IMG_2485You knew I was going to have to do this sooner or later! First post from the Reggae Marathon, Half Marathon & 10K and site of the Reggae Runners Half Marathon Challenge. This is all fun and maybe just a couple of serious reflections on racing and friends. This is the fourth year in a row that I have participated. The race has grown each and year and while it is technically smaller than last year there is still a day of on-site registration. 1600 runners are signed up for the three distances, most for the half marathon and 10K but there are a whole lot of hardy full marathoners too. There is a pretty good chance of surpassing the registration count for last year. Friday is always the big day. Guess we’ll see.

I decided to come down early and enjoy some R and R. I spent a couple of days in Montego Bay with Lawrence Watson at his AirBnB (Castlevue). I met Lawrence in 2011, but never had the time to stop in at his place. This time was different. Great decision on my part. Even went running Saturday morning. And boy did I get treated to some special and authentic Jamaican food. Sunday breakfast was ackee and salt fish with fried breadfruit and callaloo. Then I headed off for Negril.

Nifty new shoes.

Nifty new shoes.

Wanting to fit in, I got into the spirit with new shoes that should do the trick. Almost the flag colours of Jamaica and should go nicely with the new singlet. Once you come here many (and that includes me) say they are 100% Jamaican by association. Even with my personal nod to Jamaica with my shoes and running gear, I will  have a Canadian flag patch prominently stitched into the combo, because let us not forget that I am 100% Canadian by birth. Funny thing though is that my Great-Great -Grandparents were in Jamaica for five years, just around 1840. Maybe that is the pull. Don’t know.

Doctor 'One Drop' Dread (my Reggae Name)

Doctor ‘One Drop’ Dread (my Reggae Name)

The Reggae Runners’ Half Marathon Challenge is something a growing number of friends indulge in just for fun. It started with three of us who met through the Reggae Marathon and related social media. When we discovered that the three of us were running a half marathon on the same day in three different places (New Jersey, Toronto, and Vancouver). Because of a wide age difference we decided to age-grade the results and use that for determining the winner. That was how Chris Morales (That Runnin’ Guy and official RM blogger), Larry Savitch and I got to know each other. By the time we got to the next Reggae Marathon our friend Navin Sadarangani had got into the mix and Deb Thomas. Last year, Jetola Anderson-Blair become a competitor and we continue to grow. The trash talk on the dedicated Facebook page gets pretty heated, but it is all in fun.

This year we will have a prize for the winner but also a special ‘Soon Come’ prize for the last place contestant. It is not simple to predict because we have three distances and ages from 35 to 69 and both genders. But, age-grading will prevail and we will have our prize winners. Oh, the ‘Soon Come’ award is being modeled by me above.

Reggae Marathon Buddies - showing 14, soon to be 18 appearances!

Reggae Marathon Buddies – showing 14, soon to be 18 appearances!

On a serious note I wanted to comment on one of my favourite photographs. It is Larry, Navin, Chris and me. Our backgrounds, heritages and such could hardly be more different, yet running brings us together and although we mostly have no personal contact other than when we show up in Negril, I think we truly are friends. The photo shows us holding up fingers to a total 14 Reggae Marathons. We have vowed the photo needs to be repeated this year and each can add another finger which will bring  the total to 18. I should say there are others who probably should be in the picture, but we four are kind of a core group and what knits us together is that when we met, we were all actively blogging about running.

The big pre-race pasta party will be Friday night and the weather looks like it will be good for the outdoor festivities. Big groups have made this their go-to event and several will be back. It is also very international. No count for 2014 but pretty common to see 30 or so countries represented. I’ve already met Americans, Belgians, Swiss, Dutch, Brazilians, and naturally a few Canadians, not to mention a bunch of Jamaicans. Stay tuned for more updates. Things are just getting going!

 

IS IT TOO SOON TO START HUMMING “ONE LOVE”?

11.07.2014
Reggae Marathon, Half Marathon & 10K

Reggae Marathon, Half Marathon & 10K

Of course not!

Besides, I am still hoping some running friends from Western Canada will be overwhelmed with my enthusiasm and decide to join me in Negril, Jamaica for the Reggae Marathon, Half Marathon & 10K on December 6. Won’t help much if I wait until the day before I leave to post up this item

Chris (That Runnin' Guy) Morales with Jetola Anderson-Blair and Lisa Laws (Head Honcha of the Reggae Running 'Black Girlz')

Chris (That Runnin’ Guy) Morales with Jetola Anderson-Blair and Lisa Laws (Head Honcha of the Reggae Running ‘Black Girlz’)

Of course the title reference is to Bob Marley’s iconic song, but it somehow represents the feel of this event for me and many others. This is not some touchy-feely thing I’m talking about, but this event has a kind of ‘family’ vibe or something. It is why I keep going back. True, I have found a small and growing circle of Reggae Marathon friends that make it special for me, but it is quite clear when you get there, that many people are having the same experience. Black Girlz Run has been making an appearance for several years and say they will top the 150 or so that showed up last year.

 

Easy Skankin'

Easy Skankin’

Easy Skankin’ (easy there folks, it is another Marley song reference) is back for maybe their fourth year. I could keep listing other groups (there are a bunch), but I think you have the idea.

Part of it may be that except for the very best runners, nobody expects a super great finish time (We’re here for a GOOD time, not a FAST time…..). The course is pancake flat, but it is normally pretty warm, moving on to hot if you take more than three hours to complete the marathon. Make no mistake, the record times are very respectable (Marathon: 2:21:05, Half: 1:08:32 and 10K: 29:55) , but most people are there for the experience.

Pasta Party Dec 6, 2013, cw one of the 'Black Girlz'

Pasta Party Dec 6, 2013, cw one of the ‘Black Girlz’ (in green team shirt)

When you drop expectations and enjoy the moment everything changes. You see it from the time you pick up your package and head to (what just might be) the “Best Pasta Party in the World”  and right on through the early start (5:14 AM early!). Oh, and while Jamaica may have a bit of a ‘soon come’ reputation, that does not apply to ‘Frano’, Race Director, who WILL send everyone out exactly at 5:15 AM. The enjoyment just starts to increase from then as you run to the sound of Caribbean music including steel drums, but here – mostly reggae.

The start is usually around 22-23C, or about 70F, plus or minus. It stays that way until the sun actually comes up around 6:45 AM. Around 6:30 AM, the sky begins to brighten and colour and if you aren’t too busy dance/running to the sounds or talking to a fellow runner, you can’t avoid some deep feeling welling up. If you just happen to be running ‘alone’ and passing by someone blasting “One Love” or even “Three Little Birds” don’t be surprised if you are overtaken with emotion (the good kind). It has happened to me!

Reggae Marathoners just before full light

Reggae Marathoners just before full light

If you are doing the 10K you might just be finishing before the sun is peaking over the horizon, and frankly, the 10K section might be the most exciting and energetic part of the course, which starts and finishes ‘in the middle’ of the route. Everybody starts out heading for Negril Town which is about 5K down the road. At the round-about you head back toward the start and when you get there the 10K folk are done. This section has most of the smaller, ‘local’ resorts, shops, eating places and such. Despite the hour, there are lots of people on the street cheering you on and ever so enthusiastic volunteers to keep you hydrated and (if you needed it) your spirits up. Half marathoners carry on past the finish and into the sunrise. Depending on how fast you might be, this is probably where you are going to encounter that morning magic I talked about earlier. This section has more of the larger ‘top end’ resorts, but still lots of spectators and sometimes hotel staff with spray hoses to cool you or sometimes goodies from the cooking staff.

Turbojet Negril

Turbojet after the marathon!

ThatRunninGuy Reggae Marathon Finish

ThatRunninGuy Reggae Marathon Finish

Myself, I like the Half because even someone going at my pace will finish not terribly long after the sun is fully up and the beach is at its best. Yes, the beach. The finish (and start) is at Long Bay Beach Park. Regardless of which of the three distances you might choose, when it is time to finish you will slip off the main road at an angle, into the finish chute. The only thing ‘wrong’ with the 10K is you don’t get to run Bob’s Mile. Again, lots of Marley inspired music and signs every hundred metres or so with “Bob’s Wisdom”. Don’t be surprised, again, if Bob’s Wisdom hits you somewhere deep. This is not just a coincidence or ‘riding the coat-tails’ of the Marley legend. There is a very real connection between race organizers and the Marley family. The marathon winners’ trophies (male and female) were donated by Rita Marley.

Reggae Marathon Buddies - showing 14, soon to be 18 appearances!

Reggae Marathon Buddies – showing 14, soon to be 18 appearances!

TSweet Reggae Music (800x678)he finish area, no matter when you get there is a place many don’t want to leave. Oh sure, there is the fresh cut coconut, the bananas (nothing quite like the taste of a banana in the place where it actually grew), pineapple (same deal) and Red Stripe and the band and the massage tents, but again it is one of those places where everyone is just feeling good, the kind of good you wish you could bottle and take home. In a way, I guess you can, but not in a bottle – just in your heart.

Even pre and post-race times have a happy vibe. Regardless of the fact that there are shuttles to the start, many walk the relatively short distances if they are within a mile or so (I usually am). The ‘party’ starts right there on the road. After everything is done and you REALLY must leave the finish area, well there is nothing better than strolling back to your ‘home away from home’, bare-foot along the waters edge on that seven mile white sand beach.

Navin Sadarangani finishing first loop of the Marathon as the sun comes up.

Navin Sadarangani finishing first loop of the Marathon as the sun comes up.

You might have noticed I didn’t say anything about the full marathon. That is partly because I have never done it. I intended to the very first time in 2011, but some transportation disaster struck and I wound up doing a very late starting 10K. I am still feeling I want to try. Will it be this year? Not according to my current registration, but they do allow you to change events. I don’t need to run another marathon, ever. Nothing says I must run the Reggae Marathon, still……………………….. A couple of my Reggae Marathon friends are encouraging me to ‘just do it’. Curiously enough they are both marathoners and Marathon Maniacs and pictured in this blog! They say you shouldn’t take advice from crazy people, but that has never stopped me in the past. It certainly isn’t that it can’t be done, heat or no heat. Of course, you do have to respect that heat if you are going come through in good condition. The race looks after you re hydration and such, but once that tropical sun is up (as it certainly would be for anyone at my pace) you must respect it. Reasonable running strategy and expectations help and they give almost anyone enough time to ‘Get ‘er Done’. We’ll see. Probably only decide after I get there and remind myself what running in tropical heat is all about. For that matter, my ego might make me drop to the 10K where I might just be able to score a podium finish in my age group!

The Challenge

The Challenge

 

Three Amigos at Ricks

Three Amigos at Ricks

Once that is all done, it will be time to have fun with all those old, and almost certainly, a few new Reggae Marathon friends. Some of us even have our own little mini competition going, called the Reggae Runners Half Marathon Challenge. Mostly it is about trash-talk and bragging rights. We have young(ish) and old, male and female, and all three distances involved. Through the miracle of the World Masters Athletics age grading calculator, we will be able to bring everyone to an age-graded half marathon time and determine the 2014 champ. Gee, I wonder if the Marleys would give us a trophy?????

 

Morning Beach Scene - Negril, JA

Morning Beach Scene – Negril, JA

Rock ‘n’ Roll is Here to Stay

11.02.2014
Striking Finisher Medal

Striking Finisher Medal

Well, at least for another year. How do I know? Well, the super-bargain advance registration for 2015 is already ‘live’.

Of course, the Rock ‘n’ Roll I’m referring to is the Rock ‘n’ Roll Oasis Vancouver Half Marathon and James Cunningham 10K, both were run October 26. They have billed the event as Vancouver’s newest half marathon and oldest 10K. The ‘new’ part is easy enough and definitely true until somebody else starts one. As for the Cunningham 10K (now 40 years) some might argue that it is also Vancouver’s newest 10K. You see, until 2014 the James Cunningham Seawall Race never was quite 10K, close but not quite.  Why? Because the Seawall is a few hundred metres shy of 10K. Newer runners who didn’t know that, used to get very excited about their 10K PB’s until they sadly found out otherwise. BUT, who is going to niggle? James Cunningham, staged by Lions Gate Road Runners is a Vancouver fixture and has been a  great event for every one of those 40 years. It was/is also a tonne of fun, coming so close to Halloween. Many people run in costume and just have fun with it, something we should all do from time to time.

[Before I go any farther, I should say this article took a bit longer than usual to post , but it was ‘one of those weeks’.]

As I made my decision to participate, I chose the Half Marathon, but then wondered if I did the right thing. The 10K James Cunningham race is every bit the great event I just described, but for some reason this VERY Seasoned Runner has never done it. Don’t know why really, but I haven’t. Well OK, one reason is that I haven’t lived in or near Vancouver for all FORTY of those years. Guess there have also been some date conflicts (personal and running) from time to time, too. Anyway, my not having run James Cunningham is no ‘statement’, just a sad fact. I should probably fix that next year!

Anyway, for better or for worse, I chose the Half. It was my second half marathon in two weeks (three weekends) and third race, with a leg of the Whistler 50 slotted in between the Goodlife Fitness Victoria Half Marathon and this weekend’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Half. It has been a busy Fall running schedule for me, with the Revel Big Cottonwood Marathon (Salt Lake City, UT) in mid-September and then these three races in rapid succession. There have been a lot of firsts in there: first marathon in Utah, first screaming downhill marathon (same one), first time for Whistler 50 Relay, and first (guess it really had to be) Rock ‘n’ Roll Vancouver event. Although I would have to go back and check carefully, the two half marathons may be my first qualifying sequence required to be a Half Fanatic. Of which sort of people, there were PLENTY at the Rock ‘n’ Roll Half.

As an old RD, I have a hard time running races without looking at an event from that perspective. One of the first things is the pre-race ‘conveniences’ (nice word for toilets). It was a big crowd at the Half start (the Cunningham race started in a different location), but there were porto-potties for miles. As we inched toward the actual start (and our wave’s turn to go, uh, RUN that is), I particularly noted that there was virtually nobody still waiting to use a PP. In other words, there were plenty.

The second thing I look for is an ‘on-time’ start. They got that too. That was not true of my last Rock ‘n’ Roll experience and a bit of a sore point as it spun out later in the race. It was also a positive in the long run. More on this a bit later.

I do hope that there may be a course revision. The first mile or so is great as you head to and through Gastown. The finish, although it was moved rather late in the game, was in a fabulous location in my opinion. I know that as I was coming around the last bit of the Seawall toward Devonian Park, it just felt right that as soon as I passed the “Zero” marker on the Seawall (yes, there is a marker) the finish was right there. You could hear it and see it for a good distance and knew you were about to arrive. Twice, I’ve finished races (marathon and half) that come around that last corner, but then continue on into the concrete and glass of downtown. There is something to be said for that finish, too, but having experienced both, I’m now a fan of Devonian Park!

They sure got it right taking the route onto the False Creek Seawall or Promenade. The Stanley Park segment (mostly on the road for the Half) is never wrong for any race. For visitors to Vancouver, (and from my casual chatting before, during and after, there were plenty of those) those parts of the route must have seemed amazing. From a very personal perspective I hope there can be a rethink of the bit from about 2-5K. It never enhanced the old Vancouver Marathon route (running the other direction) and it doesn’t match the rest of this particular route. I know part of it was a bit last minute in adjusting for the change to the finish. Given a year to work on it, I hope there might be a positive adjustment, but even if  it isn’t possible, this is still going to be one of the most scenic routes for Vancouver races.

Now, what was this thing about not starting on time in another Rock ‘n’ Roll race and why was that so big a deal? Briefly, I ran the Las Vegas Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon almost one year ago. For reasons guys like me (old RDs) understand very well, they had a strict time limit and for marathons as run in these days, a somewhat restrictive one of 5 hours. More correctly, it was a 5-hour pace to three critical points on the course. If you got by those diversion points you could actually take a lot more than five hours to finish. BUT, if you did not pass the critical points, you would be diverted (or picked up and transported, if necessary). I had been running a lot of marathons last year and knew a five hour pace through 15 miles was fully feasible. I registered and made the travel arrangements. There were a lot of fine statements about how the five hour period was a chip based time and the ‘clock’ would only start running after the last marathoner chip crossed the start-line and all marathoners would start within a certain time.  And that is where it all started going wrong.

The race was about five minutes late starting the first wave. It seems nobody told the cop at 15 miles. When I (and about 20 other runners) hit that 15 mile diversion point, we got shorted about 8 minutes. Notwithstanding the talk of chips and related stuff, the cop on the road had apparently been instructed that 8pm was the diversion time. Nobody told him (I assume) to add five minutes for the late start. On top of that, and I don’t know why, he took out another three minutes, putting the diversion in at (satellite time) 7:57pm. The howls of protest were many and loud – some even tried to argue our case. Had I missed the time, there would be not a word of protest on my part, but I (and those other 20 and I’m not sure how many more that were behind us, but within that eight minute window) did not fail our part of the bargain. There were other issues, too, but this was the biggie. Nobody on the ground seemed to care. I finished, collected my medal and then I complained.

Yes, I complained. A lot of people might just go away mad and might tell people not to run the event, or maybe any Competitor Group event. The Rock ‘n’ Roll Series is already part of a bit of a love-hate relationship in the running community. I felt that if I did not tell the organizers what I thought, I could hardly expect them to explain, or do something about it for the future. The Rock ‘n’ Roll events are what they are, a commercial venture. If you don’t want to run such races, don’t. If you like what is on offer, enjoy. This series of races fills a market niche and the needs of a lot of people. I have no idea how many ‘first timers’ take part, but I’m guessing the proportion is high. The hype, the fun, the glitz and glamour and the bling are a big draw for those first-timers.  But, old or not, I am still competitive of spirit and running the race properly is important in my mind.

As I said, I complained. What I am getting to is that THEY LISTENED. I got real attention from Competitor Group, not just a stock letter saying they were sorry I didn’t find everything perfect, and thanks for your comments. I actually had direct meetings with representatives of the Competitor Group and serious discussions. I said there were also a bunch of lesser issues and they listened and considered all of them. Has anything changed in Las Vegas? Firstly, the race hasn’t run yet, so no proof one way or another. Do I think they won’t repeat the same mistakes? I’m pretty sure they won’t. Will anyone notice? Well, that is the hard thing. We tend not to notice things that go right. When something goes wrong, we definitely notice. Oh, yes! That is a big part of the reason I have decided to include this commentary.

People who follow this blog may have noticed that I wrote rather enthusiastically about going to Vegas and “Running the Strip at Night”, but when all was said and run, there was no follow-up. Well, now you know why. I don’t like to be negative, but sure wasn’t going to sing the praises of a race I felt had got it seriously wrong. That is why I am writing this now. I want to give credit where it is due. They really didn’t need to pay any attention to me, but they did. I felt it was important to take another look from the inside and what better way than to give the ‘hometown’ race a try. I have to say it was a very positive experience and I am definitely glad I did.

I had a lot of fun. Maybe part of it was the weather. Anyone who was in Vancouver on October 25 and remembers, will know what a disaster Sunday’s race could have been. Sunday turned out to be near perfect for racing, cool and mostly sunny. Part of the fun was beating my Victoria time by 15 seconds! OK, to be honest, I really wanted to beat it by more than that and maybe in terms of pure running, I did. According to my gps device I ran 21.5km. That is more likely a statement about my attention to running each and every tangent than about the accuracy of the course. Seems like I ran 21.37km in Victoria, but I know most of that route very well, having run it some 11 times in the last 15 years. Part of the post-race fun was comparing the two events, run so close together.  I could happily see the race Sunday was a better performance. I always like that. It is about the only thing a competitive  minded person like me can hope for at this point in my career.

The truth is that everyone runs for her or his reasons and therefore have individual perspectives. Is the Rock ‘n’ Roll Half going to be one of Vancouver’s top races? All I can say is that I saw a bunch of happy faces around that finish area, and a lot of people appearing to have fun on the course. Sounds to me like a heck of a good start!

THEY GROW UP SO FAST!

10.13.2014
35 th Victoria Marathon

35 th Victoria Marathon

The title refers to races, daughters and blog posts!

We’ll start with the last. My most recent post was a bunch of small items that had potential to ‘grow up to be full blog posts’. Well, the one on the Goodlife Fitness Victoria Marathon, the first item of that last post, has grown up already! I suppose, considering the original post was made after the 2014 Race Expo had already started, that was a bit of a given.

The “Royal Victoria Marathon” is now 35 years old! Nice work, all those who have made that happen, but especially the crew that has been in place most of the time that I have known this event. The marathon goes back all 35 years. The other race weekend events have a bit of a different history, but are also what makes the whole thing work and drew some 10,000 participants this weekend.

Danielle Krysa and her Dad - that would be ME!

Danielle Krysa and her Dad – that would be ME!

Finally, there’s that thing about ‘daughters’. As I’ve said a number of times, Victoria is the family ‘go to’ race. The 35th Victoria Marathon Weekend was no exception. Our oldest, Danielle Krysa, ran her 10th half marathon on Sunday, showing the way to her old man. Still, this was a bit of a come-back for her, as she had taken a couple of years off from the half marathon. Ummm, and dare I mention it, she now runs in the W40-44 category. Talk about GROWING UP! How did that happen??? Why, I am barely out of that age group myself! OK, OK, maybe I’m a bit beyond that now, but sometimes it just seems that way. I really do feel like I am still back there about 25 years or so. As for the third member of the Cumming Family Runners, she is a bit busy ‘running for two’ just now, so not involved this time, except as a (distant) spectator.

Finishing up with family, we also got to celebrate our son’s (recent) birthday (he lives in Victoria) and visit with son-in-law and grandson. Speaking of ‘growing up’, Charlie (the grandson) is now eight. He already competes in kids triathlons. Pretty soon, grandfather and grandson are going to have to run a race together! Hmmmmm. Next year? 8K?  We could make this a really big family event. Janna, the other daughter mentioned above, called right after with congratulations and to say how she was missing this weekend. I’m seeing a big running celebration in 2015! I’ve run events with all three of our kids, with both my sons-in-law and my wife, Judi too. If everybody showed up in Victoria next Fall, we would make quite the team!  I think I have a new project!

Once again, Victoria put on a fabulous event. Part of the fabulousness (is that a word?) is the inclusiveness. There is everything from a kids’ run to the full marathon and abilities ranging from tentative first timers in the 8K to the swift elites bringing home both the half and full marathon events. When 10,000 participants show up to celebrate a weekend of running, you know you are doing something right.

The Victoria courses are interesting in that they are far from flat. Still, a lot of people turn in very good times, including PR’s and in the marathon a very high ratio of BQ times. Maybe it is the scenery (distracts you) or maybe it is the ‘rolling’ terrain that keeps different muscles working. Don’t know, but some of my own better times (half and full) have come from Victoria.

Three Amigos: Roger, Dan and BH Steve. (Photo: M. Buttner)

Three Amigos: Roger, Dan and BH Steve. (Photo: M. Buttner)

One of the big things about the Expo is the speaker series, which always includes top quality participants and plenty of them. This has been so, as long as I’ve been going to this event (15 years now). One of the key speakers this weekend was Roger Robinson. Roger never disappoints. He is also a contributor to Running in the Zone: A Handbook for Seasoned Athletes, and not infrequently a guest right here on the blog. It was good fun chatting with Roger on the sides and catching up on the latest news about him and his goodly wife, Kathrine Switzer. We had a moment with good friend, Bobble-Head Steve! Last time we were together was in Yakima, this past April for the Yakima River Canyon Marathon.

Steve King X2 (from Penticton Herald)

Steve King X2 (from Penticton Herald)

Roger was just one of eight RITZ (book) contributors in Victoria this weekend. Of course, Steve King (the non-bobbling one) was there calling runners through the finish, as only he can. Also on site were Evan Fagan, working tirelessly as a volunteer until it was time to don his shoes and do his latest marathon (#145, I believe). Of course, Rob Reid was there greeting everyone at the finish, as he has done for years now. So great to hit that finish, hear Steve’s voice and get that handshake and/or hug from Rob. (He still doesn’t know how close he came to having me barf on him a couple of years back when I really pushed my half marathon finish. Well, ‘close’ only counts in horse-shoes!)

Joe Henderson of Runners World fame (one of the original editors, he was), took part in the half marathon himself, but also brought his group from Eugene for the event. Had a great talk with him and learned a bunch of stuff. Joe is a bit older than me (nobody is saying exactly how much) and has moved into a new approach that I should be considering, for marathons anyway – slower/funner. Apparently, we passed each other somewhere around the half marathon turn-around. I was ahead and didn’t actually see Joe going the other way. He said I was going so fast he only had time for a quick wave!  Joe is my new Best Friend Forever! Nobody has EVER said that about me.

Although I unfortunately didn’t have a chance to see him and chat, Maurice Tarrant was not only there, but took First Place in the Half Marathon for M80-84, with a chip time of 2:19:28. I am pleased to say I beat him. So what if it was only by 3 minutes and 11 seconds? Maurice is such an amazing athlete!

As I’m adding up all the names of all the Running in the Zone contributors, I really should go back to Danielle Krysa. In her other life (when she is not being a runner and a mother and wife and an artist and a writer) she is a graphic designer. She too contributed to both Running in the Zone (the book) and this blog site by designing the book cover and the look of this blog! So, I guess, although she didn’t actually write anything, she would be the ninth RITZ contributor present and accounted for in Victoria this weekend.

Finally, Doug Alward was also there. I saw him on the ferry going over. At that point he said he was just there in support of a friend. However, the friend was trying to tell him he should run! Apparently, she was convincing. He won his M55-59 age group and was 53rd OA in the Half Marathon with a time of 1:23:33. Well done!  Doug has one of the most powerful pieces in Running in the Zone with his recounting of his friendship with Terry Fox, and his life-long inspiration. Doug drove Terry’s van, but they were friends from the age of about 13, so the piece in the book was far more than the story of the Marathon of Hope itself. And, of course, Terry Fox now watches over the runners in statue form at Mile Zero (which also just happens to be about 3K to go to the finish)! Never fails to inspire this runner to dig down for those last few K’s!

There are a number of things I like about this event but one of the biggies is the out and back nature of the course that means the lead athletes in the Half Marathon loop back against the course so that many people will see them in Beacon Hill Park, and if not there then somewhere after the 9K mark. Because of the Marathon’s later start, the Half Marathoners will also see the lead Marathon runners as the Halfers head to the finish. And, the pack Marathoners also benefit from the counter-flow, albeit at a different part of the course, to glimpse and be inspired by the leaders.

So, I know there are nearly 10,000 individual and personal stories of this event. This is mine. Once again, Victoria has come through with a most memorable weekend! Thanks to everyone who made it so.