Archive for June, 2018


SO YOU RAN A SUB-3:00 MARATHON. NOW WHAT?

06.26.2018

 

Walter and Matt Murdoch exit ‘the tunnel’ Light at the End of The Tunnel Marathon

This is a continuation of my posts about Walter Downey, a definitely ‘seasoned’ athlete and thus of extreme interest on this blog. Well, to the blogger anyway. Oh, and for the record, this title represents a question I have never had to ask myself! It is also about how we approach what comes after a major achievement or breakthrough. Walter is the ‘hero’ of this tale, but it is intended to be taken more generally by all readers in context of their own pursuits and performances and what they hold important.

To briefly recap, Walter made a decision almost two years ago to make some big changes and set some big goals. To achieve his goals, he did a number of things but two of the biggies were losing some weight (a significant amount) and training much more seriously. The results began with doing well in age group placements in race distances across the board and then with a string of PBs at pretty well all distances he ran. Of late, it has become an expectation that he will score a podium place, if not win his age group. He has also continued to tweak those PBs. The original story is HERE.

Recently (earlier this month), Walter scored what I would consider a ‘double unicorn’.

What in the name of all that is running, is a ‘double unicorn’????

I’m so glad you asked.

And then they were done. Walter, Matt and Ray Barrett.

For many people, especially those who would be considered ‘seasoned’, running a marathon under three hours at age 57 is rather unicorn-like (that is, extremely rare)! To be specific, Walter went 2:58:58. Obviously, that is sub-3:00. And, most of us hitting age numbers like 57 are really happy to get raw times that AGE GRADE to 2:58. Let me just put that in context. At 57 the WMA age grading calculator says if you want a graded time of 2:58:58, you must run a raw time of 3:33:10, which is a time not to be scoffed at, but it does create some context.

Although it is probably less rare, the illusive ‘negative split’ is also unicorn-like in its rarity. Walter’s splits for his sub-3:00 performance were 1:32 and 1:26 (ish). The times are unofficial and taken from his gps, but with that much of a spread, there is no doubt that he did the negative split that we all aspire to achieve. I once ran a half marathon within less than 10 seconds of being a negative split. I still consider it one of my best managed races and very satisfying with respect to personal performance.

Walter continues to do very well in his races, still taking podium after podium, often in first place in his age category. For what it’s worth, and before I leave the specific topic of his last marathon, I would point out that it age grades to an adjusted time of 2:30 and a % Performance of 83.25%.

With all of this settled and duly reported, the question of the title: “Now what?” is of greatest interest. You never want to get to that feeling of “Is that all there is to a circus?

I sat down with Walter to explore what comes next in terms of goals and aspirations, short and longer term.

The first thing we had to establish is, there is still a lot of specific ‘work’ to do before the 2018 running season is over. I’m not even going to try to list all the races, but I know he is intending to run the BC Half Marathon Championship (at Victoria) and finish up with the New York City Marathon the first weekend of November.

We also quickly established that Walter considers he has been racing and training ‘smart’. A big goal for the future is to continue exactly that way. Purely as an observer, when Walter began ramping up to his present level of performance, losing weight, running harder and faster, knocking off PB’s, I was a bit worried that he was going so hard at it that an injury was surely in his future. The concern came partly from what he was specifically doing (running every race that caught his attention, running them hard and doing big training volume), AND from the generality of what happens to all runners who push the volume and intensity too high for too long. I am pleased to say, and as Walter reports, he is now building recovery into his plans, even when he races (some are all out, some strategic).

Souvenirs from a few notable and relatively recent marathons, including 3 of the Marathon Majors.

Let’s face it, if you are competitive nothing is better than a race to make you run with some intensity and focus. That said, some races are preparation for other more important races and they don’t all have to be run at PB pace. A perfect example was that Walter ran the BMO Vancouver Marathon in May with a time far removed from his present PB performances. It was intentional. “THE race” on which he was focused was the one where he did his Sub-3:00, the Light at the End of the Tunnel Marathon. Vancouver was May 6 and the Tunnel Marathon was June 10. Vancouver was completed in a time of 3:23:37 and The Tunnel was 2:58:58. That is how it is supposed to work when you race and train smart.

This is just one example. There are others. And, while Walter has tasted the sweetness of victory (age group and outright), he is also choosing events wisely, ‘picking his fights’ so to speak. Most of the time he is top three but seldom outside the  Top 5 in his age category.

Still, it seems there isn’t a race he isn’t ready to run. I wondered if there might be an ultra in his future, especially after he is done with the PBs in the standard distances we all know and love. Apparently NOT. So, maybe there are some events he isn’t interested in doing. And, while I know he likes training runs on certain trails, he isn’t interested in classic trail races either, ultra or otherwise. So, I suppose you could say his future goals involve no ultras or trail racing.

One thing we determined more or less immediately, is that he has no intention of going out in a blaze of glory and stopping cold turkey once his running goals are met (assumed to be PB performances, he feels he could achieve).

I must admit to pondering, based on Walter’s example, how many of us ‘retire’ too soon from pushing the envelope. To be clear on that, there is absolutely no need to ‘push’, but for the highly competitive, well………………

Just to remind you, I have reported previously how he has been setting new PBs; actual, unqualified PBs, even though he has been running for something approaching 20 years, running relatively well over those years and is now in his mid-50s. A few years back, on the advice of a runner older than me, I started paying more attention to 5-year PRs. I re-examined all my five year performances and still keep annual as well as 5 year age group ‘bests’ or PRs. I have also reported that doing something a bit like what Walter has done (back when I was plus or minus 65), produced some very good results although FAR from all-time PBs. Maybe after Walter reaches his personal level of peak performance, he too will consider such record keeping, but for now he is still setting new, totally UNqualified personal marks!

OK, back to ‘what now?’.

Walter has completed four of the six Marathon Majors (New York, Chicago, Boston (X3) and Berlin). Remaining are London and Tokyo. I doubt I would surprise you by stating there is a plot afoot to complete these two ‘missing’ marathons. The lottery is not particularly reliable, so it seems money may be the answer. By that I mean using a travel package or a charity bib to attain the needed entry. We chatted about the fact that we have both (along with a few dozen of our closest friends) submitted our names to the ‘ballot’ for London. The odds are a bit better than Lotto-649, but only slightly it seems. Obviously, this is one answer to the title question: complete the Big Six.

Another specific race based goal is a better half marathon time. According to Walter, his Half PB is not proportional to other personal records for marathon and 10K. He feels his times for both those distances are much better than his half time. He is working on it and strategically eyeing the races in his future. As I began writing, the very next one was to be the Scotiabank Vancouver Half Marathon on June 24, 2018. Two things can mitigate against it being the race where Walter corrects this perceived ‘imbalance’. The Scotia Half (as it is known locally) purports, or at least appears to be a fast and easy course, but it has three difficult components, two of which (hills) come at awkward points in the race. Weather is the third factor and although it was warming up by the time he finished, was probably a minor factor this time. As it turned out, the Scotia Half yielded up yet another new PB to Walter’s relentless and persistent pursuit of excellence. His time was 1:2834, good for 4th place in his M55-59 age group.

I imagine he takes comfort (not much though) in the fact he was just 16 seconds out of 3rd and that truth be told it was the ‘graduation’ of Coach Carey Nelson into the age group that pushed him into 4th. Carey was first with a 1:23:58. What’s a body going to do?? At least it was a good friend who pushed Walter off the podium. I will have to consult to determine whether or not the new PB corrected the so-called imbalance at half marathon, but my first reading of it, suggests that while a PB is a PB, this particular one is still not quite what Walter would want. Never mind, there are two more half marathons in his immediate future with potential to deliver even better times (Victoria Half and the Iron Horse Half Marathon). The quest continues!

Finishing up at Blueshore Financial Longest Day 5K – a fixture in both race series.

Coming off his 2017 performances, Walter set his cap for doing well in two race series that happen in BC. One is the Lower Mainland Road Race Series and the other is the BC Super Series (for readers not presently running, this was the Timex Series). Some races are common, but as the name suggests, the Lower Mainland series is limited to events in the Lower Mainland area, in and around Vancouver. Without getting into the weeds on series scoring (they are different) Walter is well positioned in both. In both cases you must complete a minimum number of events, but you only score your best results, discarding poorer results after you surpass the official minimum number of races. He has been working hard to achieve his best possible outcome and while there are several races remaining in both series, it is becoming increasingly difficult for anyone in his age group to catch up (there are only three races remaining in each series). He has already completed the minimum for both series and has a significant gap on those coming behind. Just in case the wording of this description might be misconstrued to imply he will be sitting back on what is ‘in the bank’. He won’t. Anyone who thinks they have an outside chance of catching him is going to have to work for it.

Another related matter is the challenge of doing well at the BC Athletics Championship races at standard distances: 5K (2nd), 8K (1st), 10K (2nd), Half Marathon and Marathon (2nd). Only the Half Marathon Championship remains for 2018 (Goodlife Victoria Half Marathon in October). Walter has competed in all of the events so far and, as noted, has achieved age group first or second placements in all. Interestingly, there is no particular single rival. He has placed either first or second, but the others who were just ahead or just behind consist of four different runners. I guess that makes Walter a ‘man for all seasons’ where it comes to race distance and excellence. It will be interesting to see how much he can tweak his performance before getting to the BC Half Marathon Championship in Victoria in October.

A few momentos from Walter’s more recent races.

I always try to make these posts at least a little bit generic and instructive to a wider audience. In reporting the specifics, I hope to inspire the more general thoughts and aspirations among readers. In this instance, Walter Downey is doing what turns Walter Downey’s personal crank. It is admirable and to be celebrated, but just because he wants to and can, there is no reason it should be someone else’s dream. We all have, or should have, our own.

At an impromptu post-race brunch after the recent Scotiabank races (there was a 5K, too), Coach Carey asked me how many of the Big Six I had run. ONE. New York. That’s it. I guess that if I got silly lucky later this year when ballot results are announced, I could move that up to TWO by doing London next year. That still leaves four, one of which I would have to sacrifice a point of principle to do – Boston. You CAN do it with a charity bib, but I long ago decided that because it is what it is, and I am what I am, the only way to do Boston would be to Qualify. That seems a ‘bridge too far’ for this Ancient Marathoner.

Other than working hard enough to win or at least place at most of my races, most of Walter’s personal goals are off the charts for me. No problem. I have my own past glories and future plans. Same like everybody else! The point then, is that this article is intended to inspire you to THINK about what you might do (if  you haven’t already).

Pre-Race with Walter Downey – BMO Vancouver Marathon 2018

I do have to admit that I was anticipating a few more zen-like ideas from Walter. That was possibly naïve of me. His current performance level is way too high and a ‘work in progress’ to be seriously looking at hanging up the racing flats and contemplating long easy runs in pastoral settings. Good Lord, I’m 73, kind of broken and slow and I’m still not thinking that way! A common friend of Walter’s and mine, is Rod Waterlow. In about a month, he will turn 81. HE isn’t thinking about pastoral run-walks either. I don’t know why I thought Walter would go there at this point, so there is a lesson for me and for you.

I did pose the question “Now What?” And, I did get some worthy answers. I suppose we should just leave it at that. In the meantime, I shall pursue some of my own goals that have been inspired by watching Walter, studying and writing about the adventure he is on at this point in time.

A PARTING TRIBUTE TO RITZ CONTRIBUTOR, MAE PALM

06.13.2018

I learned today that Mae Palm has died after a battle with lung cancer. She will be missed. When we were putting together “Running in the Zone: A Handbook for Seasoned Athletes“, co-editor Steve King told me we HAD to get a contribution from Mae Palm. You will see why when you read what follows. The only one who seemed to disagree was Mae, who felt, nay insisted, that she really didn’t have anything to contribute, and besides wasn’t much of a writer. Thankfully, WE insisted even more strongly, that she most certainly DID have something to say and told her not to worry about her writing – ‘just tell your story’, the editors will ensure it gets written. Following is her chapter, and (then) bio, direct from the book.

Mae Palm (Wilson)

Mae Palm with Frank Shorter

Born in South Africa in Johannesburg in 1939, Mae immigrated to England in 1956 and moved to Canada in 1966. Although she is also known by her married name, Wilson, Mae uses Palm for all her races in memory of her parents. Because of the apartheid problems in South Africa her father would often say “You are a Palm and you are Number One!” She is of mixed origin.

Mae started running in 1978 and started racing in 1980, at the age of 40. She only took up swimming at the age of 58 so she could compete in triathlons and has never looked back. She has not only completed over 100 marathons, but also regularly racks up a 1st place finish in her category! Known as “Marathon Mae”, Ms. Palm is a Canadian and North American record-holder and an inspiring individual to meet.

Mae is the mother of a son, Brendan and a daughter, Breanna and now a grandmother and even though she now resides in a seniors residence, she surely qualifies as the fastest senior in town!

One of Mae’s running highlights has been competing in the “Diamond Head Duet” a pre-marathon fun-run team event which is part of the Honolulu Marathon. For several years her partner was 1972 Olympic Marathon champion, Frank Shorter, shown with Mae in her photo, above.

Unfortunately, Mae finds the cost of entry fees, especially for international competitions prohibitive and in the past has had to pass up competing in events for which she has qualified, including the Boston Marathon and the Hawaiian Ironman due to the expense. She relies on sponsors to help offset the athletic costs involved with competing in triathlons and other events. Supported by Triathlon Canada, Mae was recently recognized with a grant from the Canadian Athletic Achievements of Women in Sport (CAAWS) and will use the WISE Fund for registration fees for upcoming competitions, including the World Ironman Championships in Hawaii. In 2005 Mae received an award from Sport BC, the Community Sports Hero Award (Sea to Sky Community Area) in recognition not only as a volunteer but as a motivator and promoter of sport.

[Ed. Note: Following is the un-edited text of Mae’s contribution, as published in 2005 (except that the original had no photographs, which have been added). No links were added, as is normal on the blog, as this is meant to be a faithful reproduction of what Mae gave us for the book. For more information, contact the editor at danbcumming@gmail.com]

They Call Me Marathon Mae!!

Mae Palm

I was born in Johannesburg, South Africa on December 26, 1939. At that time my family lived as ‘coloured’ in an area that became known later as Soweto, but at that time it was known as Alexandra Township. It was for Blacks and Coloureds only. My father had the pride and inner courage to open a business in a town for Whites called Ferndale, so we hid our true identity to be accepted as White. My Dad had the audacity to claim our darker coloured skin was due to Portuguese heritage! I credit this upbringing and my experience from that time with empowering me to be the best at whatever I do, whether it is working as a maid (something I did for a time) or competing as an Ultra runner.

When it came time for me to find work, my birth certificate had to be shown and it told the real story. In those days my options and opportunities were severely limited due to apartheid. In 1956 I immigrated to England, where I lived until 1966. I was able to do this thanks to my Mum, who saved any money she could in her special little “brown bag”. Mum and Dad ran two stores side by side called – you guessed it – Palm Stores. My Dad was a very proud man, and did not want to ‘yes sir’/ ‘no sir’ anyone. He went into business for himself and became his own boss. When you go through hard times I believe it makes a better person out of you. Dad would often tell us: “You are a Palm and you are Number One”.

For me running started when I was in my late 30’s. It was about the time when I started driving a car, walking less and noticing that I was gaining weight. Being just 4’11” in height, I didn’t want to wind up as wide as I was high! As a ‘stay at home Mum’ of two children, it didn’t take too long to realize that if I was going to do it, I needed to walk or run at 6am to have my then-husband at home with the sleeping children. For me, this was simply the best timing. I think most people will quit running if they do not choose the right time of day. When I began working in Whistler in 1982, I found that this early morning exercise schedule could be continued with good effect. It is when I became a “5-9” person. That is right: five to nine. It included my 9-5pm work schedule, something with which most people are more familiar. I would be up at 5am to go for a run and hit my bed at about 9pm, soon after the kids. That has been my routine for over 25 years now. For me, it’s now just part of life. I guess I run for the health of it!

My first race was in 1980 in Squamish, BC and was an 8km run. Maybe more to my own surprise than anyone else’s, I placed first in my age category – the rest is history! This first race hooked me on racing. As most of my running and training has been achieved by self coaching, I really have nobody to blame but myself when I don’t do well. Still, I strongly believe that I have managed to stay uninjured by listening to my body and backing off when I need to do so. That is to say, I have never missed a race that I have entered due to injury. I live by a personal rule to never bite off more than I can chew and that has been a key component of any success I have achieved. I run because I love it and if I manage to place first in any competition, well that is just ‘icing on the cake’.

I truly thrive on other peoples achievements, especially if they are older or are physically challenged. It is seeing and hearing success stories in the sport world that inspires me. Knowing what others can do, especially those with some kind of extra challenge to meet or overcome, helps me to grow stronger. I have a great appreciation for the volunteers at races and always try to let them know that in real terms. I once had a running friend comment, ‘If you would only stop thanking all the volunteers you would improve on your time!’ To me that is neither important nor possible. It just isn’t my way. I love the healthy friendly enjoyment of the run itself, the longer the better. It’s like being at a big party where you dance for 3 or 4 or 5 hours.

There was a time (age 13-26) when I used to smoke and drink but that was the limit of my use of any kind of drugs, and I have always stayed away even from pain killers. I want to know what my body is feeling and how it is doing. I stopped smoking when I was three months pregnant with my son Brendan, more than 36 years ago. And, while on the subject of family, I also have a daughter, Breanna, who is a seven years younger than her brother.

Quitting willy-nilly is not in my nature, so I always try to make sure I can finish whatever I start. Experimenting in a new sport is a real ‘high’ for me. That attitude has taken me to marathons, Ultra running and Triathlon. But, let’s start at the beginning. After running for a bit I found out that I had the mental strength to endure long distance running, so over time I went from running 2 miles every day in the first couple of years of my regular running, to the slightly further distance of 100 miles. That transition took until 1994 at the Western States 100 Miler. I did that run in a time of 29 hours 54 minutes and some seconds, only 6 minutes to spare before the cut off of 30 hours! But, I did it!

I had the pleasure of meeting Helen Klein. She actually passed me in the dark of the night – what an amazing woman – she was in her early 70’s at the time. Even though she only started running in her mid-50’s, she is a superb senior athlete and has held many age category records. She is a great inspiration and gives me hopes for my own endeavours in the 65-69 age category.

One of the happiest, most pleasurable, and OK –luckiest, parts of my running career came when I partnered with Olympian Frank Shorter (1972 and 1976 gold and silver medalist for the marathon) in “the Diamond Head Duet” a pre-marathon fun run which is part of the Honolulu Marathon. The “Duet” is a 4.6 mile marathon primer and with our combined ages we were placed in the 100-119 age category. In the four or five years we competed together, we always placed first because Frank was so fast. Frank, through the inspiration he gave, drove me to compete at my highest level and to work very hard for him. He was always so gracious. He came, this Olympic hero and fantastic runner, to pick up Breanna and me and to take us to all the events he had to attend. We met his wife and their baby girl. We went to the beach with them and were treated like old friends.

I found myself amused and amazed to be standing side by side with Frank (after the main event “the marathon”) while waiting for the results to see how we did and discussing the race. It seemed so strange to be there along side an Olympian who just treated me like a buddy (in between signing autographs, of course!).

A good example of how running makes her ‘beam’. Peach City Marathon (near Penticton, BC)

I love running. It is really that simple. It has brought me through troubled times and is a great stress release. It just always makes me feel like I am beaming and smiling not only on the outside but from within. What keeps me going is really quite simple. I want to continue setting the best example I can for anyone who might be interested. But most of all, now that I have a grandson, my dream is to be able to do a run with him one day.

Dag Aabye, a Squamish forestry worker, and locally well-known skier and runner, encouraged me to believe in myself and believe that I could become a long distance runner. He used to see me on my early morning two-mile runs as I would pass his house and one day he just came dashing out of his house, stopped me and said: “You are a runner and you should do a marathon!” It was his encouragement that sparked a personal and ongoing passion for marathons even though I little knew what a marathon was at the time. It was also what inspired me to compete in the grueling Whistler Marathon in 1982 and again in 1983.

During my Ultra running days, I was so pleased to meet Ann Trason, female winner of the 1994 Western States 100 Miler. This was a real highlight for me. Ann is an amazing woman and, I think, very shy. Two weeks after the 100 Miler race, I completed the North Shore Knee Knacker 30-mile ultra marathon (North Vancouver, BC) and won my division. As I crossed the finish line, race organizer Enzo Federico announced that I had run the Western States 100 Miler as a “training run” for the Knee Knacker. I hadn’t actually thought of it that way, but……

In 1995, I raced again in the North Shore Knee Knacker wearing a pair of Nike racing flats and I elected to not carry any water. The bottom of my racing flats had slight ridges but no tread. I am pleased to say that I bettered the time of my previous year by over 1 hour and finished in 7:20:26, breaking my own race record of 8:21:33 which I set in 1993. In 1996, I was thrilled to be one of 10 trail-runners highlighted in the Discovery Channel’s show “Go For It!” The show followed the runners through the terrain of the 30 Mile Knee Knacker course and filmed the trail running experience.

Medals and ribbons and trophies are good, but my personal reward for running a marathon is Haagen Daz ice cream! Well, that is if I have done really well; actually any ice cream is good and originally my favorite treat was waffles with oodles of cream and blueberry sauce. Treats are rewards and not for all the time. I have to earn them. Of course, I am the only one keeping track, but that is the way it is.

As the clock and calendar tick away, I take nothing for granted. Even though I enjoy good health and do marathons and other such endurance races, I am grateful to be able to walk to the bathroom and just be able to be self sufficient. I feel very fortunate to be in good health, when I know that others are not and that there is no guarantee for any of us. I like to challenge myself, but not to the point of being ridiculous. I know my limits and run against my own times.

I think it was quite fitting and made a bit of personal history in planning my 100th marathon in Vancouver. Although I go by Mae Wilson for most things, I use my maiden name, Palm, for running. I do this as a memorial to my late mother who passed away in 1990 on the very date of the Vancouver International Marathon. When my good friend Steve King, announced this at the race, it was very special and heart warming. Steve always has a way of making one feel so good through his encouraging and nice words.

In September 2002, I was featured in the article ‘The Ages of an Athlete” in an issue of Sports Illustrated Women. The feature was on growing old gracefully and the changes an athlete experiences. I was the only Canadian featured in the article and represented the 60’s category. Like everyone, I have had lot’s of photographs taken by family, race photographers and even a reporter or two, but it was my first ‘photo shoot’ with a New York professional photographer. To say the least, it was a memorable experience and I felt truly honoured to be chosen. The article featured athletes from a 9 year old basketball player running through the decades to a 93 year old swimmer.

A local, internationally recognized triathlete, Bob McIntosh was tragically and brutally killed in 1999. In that same year, in recognition of him, the Bob McIntosh Triathlon was organized in Squamish, BC. While I didn’t know him well, he would joke with me about becoming a triathlete, little realizing that I could not swim with my face in the water or that when I first tried my hand at triathlon in 1989 in Whistler on a dare, I was the last one out of the lake. I did every stroke I knew (including the backstroke) to avoid putting my face or nose in the water. I concluded at that point that I was not triathlon material! So, I thought I would volunteer for the 1999 event. When the local paper called to find out if I would be entering, I laughed at the idea. Apparently, they didn’t know much about my swimming abilities either. After I put the phone down from the local reporter, I gave the race another thought. Why not try? Other people swim. I could take swimming lessons and I began to build my courage, telling myself that ‘you are never too old to try’. I still feel the swim is the scariest part of triathlons, but my determination and perseverance motivated me to take lessons, practice and force myself to swim more effectively and conquer my lifelong fear of swimming. I participated in the 1st Bob McIntosh Triathlon as a personal memorial to Bob.

IronMan Championship 2001 – Kona.

In 2001, I won, my age category, in the very windy and scary World Ironman Championship Triathlon in Kona, Hawaii. As far as I know, I was the only Canadian representing my age category at the World Championships. As someone who has always been content to finish each race this was an achievement I had never even considered. This win was definitely ‘icing on the cake’! Sadly, my family was unable to attend the race and celebrate that special victory. Still, it was a glorious moment to share the win with fellow Ironman athletes while sitting at the awards ceremony with an ‘all Canadian’ table. I will admit that there is some loneliness in being a long distance athlete, especially when you are self coached. However, the win in 2001 was a very proud moment that makes it all worthwhile. It was like a dream, but it encouraged me and makes me feel there still so much to learn and improve on with triathlons. More than that, it gives me the confidence to know I can achieve both the learning and the improvement.

The goal today is to remain healthy and injury free so I can enjoy having athletic fun with my grandson and the rest of the family. I sometimes dream of ‘finishing’ what my young hero, Terry Fox, could not do, at least in a physical sense. It is my dream and my ambition to do runs and events for a cause rather than just selfishly doing them for my own achievement and satisfaction. I often dedicate a given run to the memory of someone, but would like to be doing more. The inspiration of Terry Fox tells me there is something out there that is one day going to click with me and then I will know what my cause will be. I truly believe in being careful and listening to my body. With this attitude and approach, I think I could do a marathon a day for as many days as it would take.

 

Rest in peace, Mae. This marathon is done. We will miss you.