AM I CERTIFIABLY CRAZY, OR JUST A MANIAC?

04.20.2018

That is a rhetorical question. Please don’t answer! And naturally, Maniac refers to Marathon Maniac.

The answer to that is: MM #6837, or YES – Level 2/Silver, no less.

‘Why the question?’ might be a better thing to ask, though.

I will tell you. Or, I will tell you why the question is posed and you can decide, but please don’t answer, anyway.

Finishing my very first marathon.

On May 1, 1988 I ran the Asics Vancouver International Marathon. I even wore Asics shoes. But I digress. It was my FIRST marathon. I will admit, number two took a long time to get in the books (Royal Victoria International Marathon, October 2000, to be precise), but I have been busy since then.

My Marathon Maniac count is now at 28. I put it that way because they count anything longer than a marathon for your total, as long as the race meets certain standards for timing, measurement and participation. One of my 28 ‘marathons’ was a 50K Ultra. OK, this is just a bit of bragging since it actually has very little to do with the story. Now, if it was 29 marathons in the book, well, that would be a whole other matter!

In May 2008, I ran the BMO Vancouver Marathon. I also ran in 2004, 2006 and 2014. For anyone having trouble keeping track or not particularly caring at this point, that total is FIVE. I’ve also done the Half Marathon six times for a total of eleven Vancouver Marathon events.

Why did I mention 2008 first? Obviously, it was the 20th Anniversary of my first, in 1988.

Why did I just switch my registration for 2018 from the Half Marathon to the Marathon (even though I am far from trained to actually RUN a marathon)?

Of course!

Because it is the 30th Anniversary of the first one. It is also why, if I had already done 29 marathons, it would be an even bigger deal, as it would create great symmetry by being my 30th marathon, done on the 30th Anniversary of the first. I suppose that mark is still available should I do one more sometime this year, making it 30 in my 30th Anniversary year. I could do another one before Vancouver, too, but that WOULD be crazy!

If you were reading closely in the last paragraph, you would already have figured out why the title asks about being ‘certifiably crazy’.

I will now explain why I don’t actually feel this is crazy. Maniacal perhaps, but not crazy.

I do not intend to RUN this marathon in May. I plan to DO it. The great opportunity here is that Vancouver has a seven hour clock. I intend to train up to at least half marathon distance and to run some of the course and walk some.

Seventh and Final Summit – it wasn’t really that bad!

Last October, I took on Forerunners‘ Seven Summits of Vancouver Challenge with about the same training as I will have by the time of the Vancouver Marathon. The route for the Seven Summits is amazingly similar to the Vancouver Marathon through quite some portion of the event. The Challenge started at Forerunners on Main and headed up over the top of Queen Elizabeth Park, or as we called it when I was a kid growing up in the neighbourhood, Little Mountain. The Marathon starts by Hillcrest Park at the north-side ‘foot’ of Little Mountain, no more than a mile from Forerunners. Both, using slightly different streets, wind up at the foot of the Camosun Hill (Marine Drive and Camosun). They go up that ugly hill, then over to 16th, out onto the UBC campus and eventually back onto Marine and down the big hill to Spanish Banks. While not exactly the same, both follow along the beaches until they reach and pass over the Burrard Bridge, continuing down Pacific until they get to Stanley Park. At that point the Marathon has only about another 10K to go, mostly on the Stanley Park Seawall. The Seven Summits Challenge heads up OVER Prospect Point, back down and up Pacific for another pass over Burrard Bridge, up and up until reaching “The Crescents” above 16th and Granville and down a little until making the last bit of ascent to the Forerunners store at 23rd and Main. Marathon = 42.2km. Challenge = 47km.

My strategy for the Challenge was to run the downs, walk the ups and decide when I got there, what to do about the flat sections. It worked well and in the end was a lot of fun.

Nearing the finish in 2008 – 20th Anniversary

Backing up a little, I have to say that I have never, ever, approached a marathon this way. I have run every marathon I have ever done, to the best of my ability. More than a few were less than stellar, but they were the best I had at the time. I ran one, Eugene, a bit injured (now that was kind of crazy). I ran a whole sequence a bit off peak, when I was trying to move up to Silver Maniac status (had to do 6 in six calendar months to qualify). But, they were strategic and actually the best I could do under the circumstances. Writing this reminds me that my 20th Anniversary Vancouver Marathon also belongs in this list. For that one, I was well prepared, but about one week prior to the race, I slipped getting out of the shower and wrenched my back. Anyone who reads this blog knows of my long-term back problem. I knew this was strictly muscular and not a serious injury, but it still hurt – a lot. I took it really easy through the week. I lived quite near the start in those days. I woke on Sunday, feeling OK, not great, but OK. I gingerly jogged over to the start. No issues. That was actually the deciding factor between starting and turning around and going home. I won’t say I then ran an amazing race. I didn’t, but it was quite OK and I got my 20th Anniversary Vancouver Marathon done.

So here I sit with my upgraded registration in hand, anticipating doing Vancouver on the 30th Anniversary of my first. More importantly, maybe, is that I am, for the first time, anticipating/planning to do it just to get it done. A few races may have kind of turned out that way, but they did not start with that plan.

My most recent marathon – Light at the End of the Tunnel

This is important on a lot of levels. Last year, I did the Light at the End of the Tunnel Marathon thinking it was possibly my last. It was a wonderful experience though not a wonderful time. I won’t rehash the story. It is HERE if you want to read it. I did train for it and did have a race plan. A number of things mitigated against the enterprise and I knowingly ‘shut it down’ well before the finish and just kind of enjoyed the day. I knew I would not attain my goal of under five hours, so figured why not just soak it all in and enjoy.

Since then I have been thinking about how much I love marathons. There is just something about that race/distance that is not matched in other events. I ran a bunch of other races since then, even winning a bit of hardware and posting reasonable times, but the marathon is still the love of my running life. What I need to learn from some of my fellow Marathon Maniacs and a couple of personal friends, is how to just DO A MARATHON. No goal other than getting from the start to the finish with a time that up until now, I can’t PERSONALLY feel good about. To be very clear, this is not a comment about others who are happy to take 6 or 7 hours, maybe more if the race allows, to complete a marathon. It is 100% about me and whether or not I can do it.

It is pretty clear that the heavy training essential to doing well is no longer something I can manage particularly well. The rest of the family seems to think I am getting old and decrepit and that marathons are too hard. They might be right where it comes to pushing to the limit of my abilities. BUT, it is so very hard to leave the event behind. I like to race, so maybe the answer is to keep the competitive attitude for shorter distances, but adopt a new approach to the marathon. I know I won’t be alone out there while taking it easy. The only question is, ‘will I be happy?’. The answer to that question may come from doing the BMO Vancouver Marathon slow and easy and just inside the seven hour time allowed. It will satisfy my anniversary race goal. It may also give me the courage to overcome ego and keep enjoying the occasional marathon that still ‘needs’ to be done.

sorry, comments are closed