I BI’D SICK

12.13.2017

Sick, sick, sick.

Faking that I was feeling good for a Sunday beach run.

You would correctly have expected a Reggae Marathon, Half Marathon and 10K summary or wind-up by now. Truth be told, the first three words above, pretty much sum things up. I’ve been running for 33-34 years and have no idea how many destination races I’ve done in that time. Lots. I guess I can’t complain much that this was the first time I truly got ‘struck down’ by some kind of bug. That is a lot of trips and races without incident of the infection kind.

I suppose the good news is I can blame my stupid slow time on ‘the bug’. Somehow it isn’t that satisfying. I was planning to run the Half Marathon in Negril because there is a much better than average chance that I won’t be going next year and if I get back in 2019, I will be less than a month from being 75. Who knows if I’ll still be running half marathons by then. So, I really wanted to do the half marathon this time.

As race day approached and I sank ever deeper into wheezing and coughing, I knew I had to downgrade to the 10K. I did that at package pick-up on Thursday, but it was not obvious that I was even going to be able to do the 10K. By Friday, when the Best Pasta Party in the World happens, I bailed on attending. I drank fluids and scoffed down over the counter meds Friday night. Saturday morning (really, really early Saturday morning) I got up and donned my running gear. In relative terms, I wasn’t feeling too bad. At the very least, I figured I could walk the 10K if that was how it had to be. I mean, after coming all this way, I couldn’t let my other Three Amigos down when it came to our annual photo.

I wandered around more or less alone (in a crowd), just keeping a low profile. I walked from Rondel Village to the start with Chris Morales, met up with Larry and Karen, Navin and Daivati at the start, but pretty much stayed away from anyone and everyone. Precisely at 5:15am the race(s) started. I put myself well back, so it took over two minutes to officially cross the start line. I figured to just do what I could and started out at a slow easy jog. For the first time in all the times, I was able to spot myself in the start-line video. I actually didn’t look as bad as I would have thought!!

Negril River and fishing boats (what I saw for the first time on race morning).

I had planned on a regime of walking and running when intending to do the Half, so I just kind of started with that program. My intent was to walk one minute in every kilometre. That was good for a little while. The morning was pretty warm, but humidity was better than the last couple of years. With no expectations, I was actually feeling not bad and enjoying the morning. I realized when I got to the turn-around in Negril Town, that dawn was well advanced and I was seeing things I don’t usually see at that point (too dark). I’ve written about it in the past because I’ve been there on training runs at around that same time. It is magical to look down onto the Negril River with the fishing boats and white egrets still roosting in the trees along the river bank.

Soon enough, I passed the 5K point and knew I was half way home. A quick inventory showed I was feeling OK. Not, well let’s sprint a bit OK, but not falling down awful. I kept walking and running as seemed appropriate. It wasn’t long before I passed by Rondel Village and knew about how far I still had to go. I knew then that I would record another finish. The one HARD part of the 10K is that when you get to the ‘finish’ you aren’t finished! You must pass the finish chute and cheering folks, and keep going at least another 4-500m before you get to turn back and truly head for the finish line. Strangely enough, I actually felt like I was running stronger in this section and once I hit the turn-off and started trundling down the true finish chute I think I was smiling. Checking my gps report afterwards, it seems my last 2K was the fastest segment of the race! Not fast, just fastER than the rest. I guess I was feeling a bit better.

What happened next was a bit overwhelming! All my buddies started bringing me stuff. In the able bodied past, I had to get my own, but here I was with water, fresh coconut and lots of support from all these great friends. I managed to finish ahead of Larry who was having a great run in the Half and Lawrence Watson, also doing the Half and winning his age group.

Navin Sadarangani and me as the sun rises over the Finish Area.

The sun was rising over the trees and I was actually feeling pretty good (relative term, but to quote Billy Crystal – “Dahling, It’s better to look good than to feel good……………”). It was about then that I discovered my phone/camera had got drowned during the run. I put it in a plastic zip-lock bag, but I guess the bag leaked – may have ‘zipped’, but apparently it didn’t ‘lock’. I took the poor thing apart and tried to dry it out a bit, but nothing, nada, zilch. The good news was that I did get it dried out later without any further heartache or great effort. There was much talk of rice, but it wasn’t necessary in the end. Still, I got NO photos of my own from the finish party. Fortunately, a few others have shared, so I can show you how it was. The big deal, of course, was that the Four Amigos (Navin, Larry, Chris and Dan) got to take our annual photograph, showing a total this time of THIRTY fingers, representing the 30 events we have run collectively.

Four Amigos ride (run) again for a total of 30 Reggae Marathon events.

I spent more time on the actual beach this year than is my usual practice. It was so nice to just soak up the sun and dabble my toes in the sea. I wasn’t too active, but I felt pretty good. Eventually, Chris and I made our homeward (Rondel Village) trek along the beach at the water’s edge. It is so funny to run this race and wind up back at the resort in time for breakfast (not even a late breakfast) when it already feels like a full day’s work is behind us.

Chris Morales (That Runnin’ Guy) with a few Reggae Runnerz at Rondel Village

Unfortunately, it was shortly after that when I started to realize the ‘sinking feeling’ that was going to be representative of everything to follow for the next days. I was brave though. Chris does a lot of social media work with a lot of groups, one of which is the Reggae Runnerz. He was invited to their post-race “Green Gold and Black” party and I was invited as his ‘plus one’. I can’t say I was the life of the party, but was still grateful to be included with this vibrant group (a good many of whom were staying at our resort). They long ago outgrew the Treehouse! I mean, there are around 500 of them!!

Sunset from Xtabi Resort, Negril.

Sunday afternoon brought the traditional One Love Bus excursion. I went. I was quiet. I had a couple of beers and got some really great sunset photos. Last year, we had lots of fun, but the sunset was a big nothing (fairly unusual). This year it was spectacular and made up in spades for 2016. However, as the sun set in the West End of Negril, so it did on my remaining energy. I don’t think my run or other activities did me any more harm than if I had done nothing. It is typical (it turns out) of this bug that you think you are OK, then a day later, not so much. I guess I was lucky that one of my ‘better’ days was the day of Reggae Marathon. I won’t say it was like previous years, but it was a kind of quiet fun and a whole lot better than I thought it was going to be on Friday when I bailed on the pasta party.

Not much more to say. I’m still slowly recovering almost a week after getting home. Yesterday was the first time I thought running sounded like a good idea. Not such a good idea that I intend to do it anytime soon, but at least the thought crossed my mind.

Charlie and Grandad ready to run Victoria 8K

Reggae Marathon was always going to be my last race for 2017, so I can at least look back at my year of running and racing. It was an interesting year in that not all my races were meant to be all out efforts. Two of them were with my grandson Charlie and done at his pace. One was as a pacer for a time that was significantly slower than I know I could do. One of the ‘events’ wasn’t a race at all, but rather a ‘challenge’. That was the Seven Summits of Vancouver Challenge (47km), organized by Forerunners. I wrote about that a month or so ago, so won’t be repeating it here. Still, it was a highlight of my 2017. When all was said and done, and all five ‘Challenge’ days had come and gone, a total of 26 people had completed the challenge.

Light at the End of the Tunnel Marathon (#27) – DONE

I did manage to do one more marathon in 2017. My last? Maybe, but doing that particular race (Light at the End of the Tunnel) and the Seven Summits, gave me a bit different perspective on what I can maybe do in the future. There are some marathons I’d yet like to do and if the time limit is long enough, I could take all the time I want and just enjoy the experience. That said, I’m still in the middle of a plan (that this flu bug didn’t help much) to let my legs recover and get strong, relative to some serious training in 2018. IF I were to pick out a marathon for a decent time, I would need to truly train for it, no skimping on distance or speed. We’ll see. Marathon or not, I do plan to train to run as well as I can at whatever distance.

A really BIG thrill for me in 2017 has been the Your Run Starts Here – Learn to Run 5K project with Forerunners. We completed two clinic cycles just before the Fall Classic (where I paced 35:00 for the 5K). Several of my clinic folk ran and did really well. We were all thrilled. Somehow, running karma must have kicked in because even though I just did what was asked of me as 35 minute pacer, I managed to win my age group.

The entire family, post-race Victoria 2017

All in all, I ran eight actual races and did the Seven Summits Challenge. One of the races I did with Charlie was the Goodlife Fitness Victoria 8K and I could tell that while he was pushed to do the time he did, it was a six minute PB over the year before and a clear indicator that Grandad may be trying to keep up with the grandson in future races. Victoria is always the family event and 2016 was no different. All branches and members of the extended family were there. Daughter Janna ran the 8K, as did Charlie and I, while Danielle (Charlie’s Mom) ran the half marathon. The only unhappy team member seemed to be the youngest grandson, Jonah, who was pretty sure “I can run!!“. He demonstrated this to all of us. Next year, maybe he can enter the kids run.

2017 Finisher Medals (and a First). Remember when races didn’t DO finisher medals?

I mentioned running Light at the End of the Tunnel Marathon and even though my time was quite slow, I was super pleased with the day. If it is my last marathon, it was a good one to be the last. Interestingly, even though three of my eight races were based on a different intention than going as fast as I could, I still managed three podium finishes in 2016, a nice symmetrical first, second and third. Mostly, it is a result of age and attrition, but I’ll take them anyway.

As usual for this time of year, I’ve started laying out potential races for 2018. Probably, I won’t be doing all of them, but it is still good to see them laid out in context. Because my wife and I will be celebrating 50 years of marriage in August of 2018, we have planned a trip to India (and maybe Nepal) to mark the event. While I doubt I can find a race to run (we won’t be sitting still much and you would have to be in just the right place at the right time), I will at least add one, if not two, countries to my total of places where I’ve run. Please don’t tell my wife I’m looking for a race. Aaah, probably doesn’t matter. She likely already suspects I’m poking around for possibilities. I mean, we aren’t talking marathon. A 5K would do fine, but how special would it be to do some kind of race? I’ve run in some 23 separate countries over the years but I’m way down on races (just five countries).

Just writing this is making me feel better. No, not good enough to go for a run, but that time IS coming. So good to actually feel like I want to, and CAN run.

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