Catching up on things and a little bit of FUN

08.02.2017
Hayward Field, Eugene OR. Finishing the Eugene Marathon (2017) Photo courtesy of Michael Carson.

Hayward Field, Eugene OR. Finishing the Eugene Marathon (2017) Photo courtesy of Michael Carson.

Keeping Track of What Readers Like

I wrote a post (the last one) entitled “Where There’s a Will……………….” about friend and seasoned athlete, Walter Downey. I felt it was a more than worthy post about a person who had made a decision to be a better runner at an age when most of us are avidly seeking out age-grading calculators to ensure ourselves that we are at least ‘holding our own’ if and when you can mathematically take age out of the equation. If you aren’t one of the folks who has taken the time to read the post, maybe you should think about having a look. Apparently it is quite inspirational! I was inspired when he set a marathon PB at the Eugene Marathon at the age of 56.

To give a brief recap, Walter decided at age 55/56 he wanted to dig down hard and see just what he could do. It turned out that what he could do was get better (real, not adjusted terms) than he had been before. And, good enough to get age group podium placings  in all his races since November of last year, including a couple of wins. While his running is a great story, the more interesting part was probably that he took on the challenge and did what he had to do (and is still going at this point).

One of the reasons I am intrigued (beyond the obvious) is that this post is now the second most popular I’ve ever written. That factoid caused me to see just what the subjects of other popular posts might be. Well, it turns out they are all about people and their approach or dedication to running, at least as much as the running itself. There is one post that I don’t have statistics on, which I suspect is at the very least a Top Five post, but whatever, it too fits that character.

Ed Whitlock at 2016 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon.

Ed Whitlock at 2016 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon.

Bill Cumming - At Loon Lake, BC - his favourite place to be!

Bill Cumming – At Loon Lake, BC – his favourite place to be!

Two are memorial tributes to dead guys, Ed Whitlock ,who needs no introduction, and my own brother, Bill, who died way too young, but doing something he loved (playing soccer).

The top one (so far, with Walter’s piece still gathering responses) is sort of about me, but more as example than as the core subject. It was about being the best one can be. It covered a lot of territory about how one goes about ‘being your best’ as you get older and far from your best years. Of course, I guess I had a lot of experience since I really did not run in what should have been my ‘best years’, as a recreational distance runner.

Jetola Anderson-Blair models Reggae Marathon medals.

Jetola Anderson-Blair models Reggae Marathon medals.

The mystery post is about Jetola Anderson-Blair, a woman who went from not being able to walk a half marathon in three hours (2011) as a tribute to a recently deceased friend, to a BQ marathoner by about 2014. The BQs are now in double digits, but that was not the case when the blog piece was written. The only item that was not specifically about a person and their story of dedication, was one on the Reggae Marathon, Half Marathon and 10K and I suppose that in a way, the event was presented as a special case because of its ‘personality’ and dedication to the runner experience.

All of this is just to say, this old blogger is going to be looking carefully at the kind of posts that attract and satisfy most readers. I don’t honestly care about numbers (OK, a little) except as they reflect on what pleases the people who take the time to look and read. Compared to other bloggers, my numbers are pretty modest, but people DO pay some attention. For example, the piece about Walter that is now #2 (and climbing) has a reach of over 1,000. The top one, on being the best you can be, hit 1,300. The others mentioned above were just under one thousand. In context, a good many posts hit a few hundred. So, you can expect more posts of the kind just described. We aim to please!!

Teaching People to Run

Participant Guide Book and Log

Participant Guide Book and Log

Recently, I posted about a new Learn to Run 5K program that I developed for Forerunners, and which I coach and lead. As I write this, we have just completed the 10th week (12 in total) and although it involves a mix of running, slow jogging and even a bit of walking, we are now covering the 5K and just a bit more. The big news, especially for participants, is that we just ran a steady 25 minutes, and with a short easy jogging ‘break’, another 10 minutes for a total of 35 minutes running. We are at or over 5K total distance now in each of the three weekly sessions and it is a total pleasure to see the looks on the faces of participants as they realize what they are achieving. And, it is THEY who are achieving this. The clinic program is just enabling the achievements. We have never said how fast anyone will go, so pace is personal and people are encouraged to just do what works for them.

I was thrilled at the last session and only a little mortified. I got us lost in some twisty streets and the result was covering somewhere between a mile and 2K more than advertised for that session. I decided that the only reasonable thing to do was to do the prescribed workout and then finish by walking back to the store where we started. (We weren’t lost by that point.) To my surprise and delight, about half the people decided they would like to continue their easy run. With a bit of a warning to keep it easy, I dropped back to assist the others who preferred my idea of walking the final bit after the prescribed workout was completed.

What the reader should know is that many of these new runners are truly just that: NEW. At our first session, after a good bit of a walk to warm up, we did 10 reps of 1 minute running (very easy) and 1 minute walking, followed by another walking session to finish up. Some found this difficult, or at least challenging. So, it is not hard to see why these people are now more than pleased at what they are achieving.

Changing Things Up

This is briefly about me. After finishing what might turn out to be my last marathon (Light at the End of The Tunnel) and knowing my primary focus would be the Learn to Run 5K program, I have adjusted my own goals. I look at 10K as the upper limit for the moment. My races will be 5, 8 and 10K for the next while. The only one I’m not sure about is the Reggae Marathon. I would sort of like to do the half marathon again, but it could morph into a 10K too. It did last time.

Running with #1 Grandson at Goodlife Fitness Victoria Marathon (8K) - Oct 2016

Running with #1 Grandson at Goodlife Fitness Victoria Marathon (8K) – Oct 2016

In the meantime, I am signed up for the Forever Young 8K, Goodlife Victoria Marathon 8K (a return engagement with my grandson, Charlie) and will be pacing the 35 minute group at the Fall Classic 5K. My first race pacing experience was last year at the Fall Classic Half Marathon. I know, because the decisions just mentioned will leave me unready for a half marathon, that I would not want to take on the responsibility to pace at half marathon. When contacted about 2017, I mentioned this and allowed as how I would be thrilled to pace the 35 minute 5K group. Boom! I was in and very excited about it, because our next Learn to Run 5K clinic targets this very race as an option for those who may want to take their newly developed running skill into a race environment.

I am very pleased with my decision and how it is all playing out. A little self analysis never hurts anyone! Will I race long again? Who knows? I may. At least up to half marathon. Will I NEVER run another marathon? It kind of feels like it, but temptations may arise and after I get through a year or so of ‘rest and recovery’, or if I can convince myself to run in a way (with having fun as my only race goal) that is less a strain. I am pretty sure I won’t run another one with a performance based goal.

The Reggae Marathon, Half Marathon and 10K

Late afternoon sun outside Rondel Village - Day 1

Late afternoon sun outside Rondel Village – Day 1

Yep, that one again! My hotel (Rondel Village) is booked and decisions are being finalized on just what the whole trip will look like. This will be my seventh year in a row. There was certainly no intention back in 2011, when I went for the first time, to be starting a ‘streak’. I still haven’t booked flights (because I don’t have the full trip figured out yet – there is some genealogical work I want to do re my Great Great Grandparents who were stationed in Jamaica from 1839 to 1844). I haven’t even registered for the race. I haven’t decided the distance yet!!!! What to do, what to do?

Well, one thing I DID do was to set up a Facebook page called the West Coast Reggae Runners to help other local folk thinking about this event. I’ve put a lot of info there for those wanting to know more about the race(s) and the logistics. If you wonder why I would be so attracted that I am heading back for the seventh time, you may want to check out the page (it is a closed group, but we are pretty welcoming to legitimate requests to join). Canada is the second largest international contingent behind the USA. Naturally, the largest block is made up of Jamaicans, but most years there are something around 35 countries represented across the three events.

There are some big new things ahead, with a registration cap (all events) of 3,000. While the race has never seen those numbers to date, distance running in Jamaica has taken a new life and there is a publicly supported program called Jamaica Moves that will encourage people to try one of the Reggae Marathon distances. So, with recent registrations of about 2300, a growing international recognition of this as a top level destination race, and Jamaica Moves on the rise, a total registration of 3,000 is not beyond a reasonable expectation. Guess I better get signed up!

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