Archive for March, 2015


THE EMOTIONAL SIDE OF RUNNING

03.22.2015

Jamaica Sunset - Copy

From time to time I’m known to drift off into this ‘thinky’ kind of writing. Actually, this particular post was inspired by something on social media, in which an individual was talking about running her first marathon with her husband (also a first). She had lots of questions about what to do and how to do it. Among others, I got into the conversation, but soon realized the most important advice was to remember that no matter what, it was their FIRST marathon and should be enjoyed as such because there would never be another one. Seems like I hit a ‘chord’ because a lot of people quickly agreed that they should soak in all the good stuff about a first marathon, especially that one and only FIRST MARATHON FINISH.

That was what got me thinking about the emotional side of running. The more I thought, the more I realized it could be the topic for a book rather than a puny little blog post. From my perspective, here are some top of mind aspects of the emotional part of running.

Vancouver Marathon 1988 (near finish)

Vancouver Marathon 1988 (near finish)

Since the only stuff I really, really know about is my own stuff, we’ll start with MY first marathon. I know that not everybody has done a marathon and that there is no need to ever run one. Still, for those who have or might be thinking about it, the first one has a special place in a person’s running history. For some, it may be special in their life experience.

There are a lot of mechanics to running a marathon whether you are an elite runner stepping up to that first competitive marathon, or a back of the packer taking on a personal challenge. Not having much first hand knowledge about the elite end of things, I will concentrate on the mid to back of the pack folk. Not to beat a good horse to death, I will mention once again that my first and best marathon was run in 1988 when I was 43 and was at a time just under 3:25. No chips then, so I’m rounding down a gun time of 3:25:19. Age grading would give me a theoretical time of about 3:14. I’m trying to squeeze this down to the very best time I can, at least partly to show I was an OK runner but certainly not sub-three hour, which a lot of people see as some kind of dividing line. I do.

I trained hard for that race, as hard and well as I’ve ever done. At the time, I was hanging out with a bad bunch of hard-core runners. Being weak, felt I had to do what the ‘other kids’ were doing. I ran six days a week, fitting in all the hills, speed work and intervals you might imagine as well as long runs, including doing the marathon distance twice in training. Naturally, races were done as part of the preparation and it turned  out that I ran my half marathon PB a couple of weeks before my target marathon (while holding back – at least I think I was). When the race got really near, I worked out a personal pacing plan. All this is to set the stage for my first marathon, the Vancouver International Marathon (1988). I can honestly say it was my best ever race. Best in the sense of management of my performance against my race plan. I ran exactly as planned, finishing within seconds of my target time and just as importantly, hitting my split times. I felt spent, but not exhausted. I could have run farther if the finish required it, but when I stopped I was done and could hardly even step up over the curb.

Vancouver Finish 1988 - My first marathon.

Vancouver Finish 1988 – My first marathon.

The big thing I remember about the last part of that race was the ‘bargaining’. Originally I planned that if I felt good with 5K to go, I would –  GO that is. Well, I did feel good, but at 37km, 5K seemed a lot longer distance than it did while plotting all this out on paper. “OK, 3K then.” That would be fine.

At 3K the discussion was repeated. I was still feeling pretty good, but did not feel a kick waiting to happen. “Carry on carrying on!” At a mile to go, it would be put it all out there time. When I saw the Mile to Go sign my brain said to my legs, “OK, let’s DO IT! Pick it up and take it home!” The reply from legs was something along the lines of: “Fine brain, you come on down here and do just that!” In fact, I pushed as hard as I could, but suspect that rather than faster, I just didn’t go slower. Remember in 1988, not only were there no chips, there were no gps devices to download your race to a computer for post-race analysis. I just know it was a strong finish and the best I could muster.

The last mile was quite respectable. I was definitely running, probably faster than I can right now on a good day at any distance. When I came to the finish, the precise location wasn’t as obvious as it is now with the timing mats, so I decided to run through the finish, just to be certain. I still remember the finish line official grabbing me and yelling “Stop! You’re done!!!”.

One reason I admonish first timers, or ‘marathon virgins’, to really enjoy the moment is that I had been so wrapped up in running to a high standard that I didn’t have that sense of great achievement until later. Oh, I was pleased with myself and had no doubt in my mind as to what I had done. The thing is that most of the marathoners in my club were those ‘sub-three’ people. I hadn’t got anywhere near that so was feeling more satisfied than ecstatic.  It was only later, a few days actually, that it began to dawn on me what I had done in a personal sense. It was only then that I had a feeling of great joy. Maybe because it took that long, it was the ‘best managed race ever’ idea that filtered through first and of that I was terribly proud. As I let that emerge, so then did the powerful feeling of knowing I was a MARATHONER. I guess nobody says that must happen at the finish line or it doesn’t count!

Most people do ‘get it’ when they cross the finish line, and the finish area can be a pretty emotional place. Oh yes, there ARE tears. I love to be there, especially when it is one of my charges from the running clinic where I lead a pace group, who is completing that first marathon. People start as runners and finish as marathoners. It is a magic thing.

For the moment I am mostly going to stay with my own examples and the marathon, because there can be a lot of emotion attached to a running achievement depending on circumstance, quite independent of performance.

Completing Victoria Marathon (October, 2000)

Completing Victoria Marathon (October, 2000)

I didn’t run my second marathon until 12 years later. I wasn’t planning on being a ‘one and done’ marathoner, but they weren’t as common as they are today. I was busy with work and family and frankly had no sense of urgency to do another one. My running was steadily improving and if I had any kind of a plan, it was to do the next one in 1990. Sadly, about a year after my first marathon I ruptured a disk in my back. It wasn’t until a good year after that when I was back to running of any kind, never mind being trained to do a marathon. In 1991 I did start training with a chap from work, but it was just too difficult with the work schedule, related travel and all. Fast forward to 2000 when for a bunch of reasons I just decided a marathon needed to be done. It turned out to be the (then) Royal Victoria Marathon. Did I run it well? I don’t know, but I finished and with the history of the back problem, this one may have been more emotional than the first one! It was interesting that even though I had trained pretty well and knew I should be able to finish, there was more uncertainty about how well I would do and even about finishing if I raced the distance.  There was an added bonus to this one, as I ran it with daughter Janna. Well, not exactly ‘with’ if you get my drift! Crossing the finish of my second marathon may have been more what the first should have been (on the day). Let’s just say it was pretty emotional. I had overcome a physical barrier and proven a point, to myself. AND, it was the first time I’d run a marathon with one of the kids! Running with our kids has been a big thing for me, and soon I can number a grandson along with the kids!

Family Half Marathon Challenge Complete

Family Half Marathon Challenge Complete l-r Danielle, Dan, Janna, Cameron

I think my MOST emotional marathon finish came by complete surprise. And no, I’m not going to describe every one of the 25 marathons I have run. What I am trying to get across is how we can be emotionally impacted by our achievements for reasons not directly related to the running itself. Number three was back in Vancouver in 2004. By this time, the idea of running a marathon was not quite the big deal it had been. I knew I could do it.

Until late in 2003 I had been very personally and professionally invested in a company that had huge problems. Foolishly I see now, I had put a lot into trying to ‘fix’ the unfixable. I pulled the plug in September of 2003. Training for Vancouver 2004 was never attached in any way to my career decision. It was just something I had time to do and wanted to do. So, cut to the finish of a so-so marathon that was kind of OK at the time, but which now rates only as my 8th best overall and 14th when age graded.

I was pleased to finish, but expected that I would. In those days Vancouver Marathon meant it when they said “Finisher Shirt“. You only got it when you were done. I wandered along through the athlete area of the finish and eventually collected my shirt. I decided to sit down and change into my new, hard earned and most importantly, DRY shirt. As I peeled off my soggy race shirt it was as if it somehow represented the difficulty of the last several years. I just dissolved in tears. I was literally sobbing for a couple of minutes. Good thing nobody was really near because they would have figured something was seriously wrong. The truth was, at that moment, things had become seriously RIGHT. It was completely emotional and symbolic, but it seemed like finishing that marathon had become emblematic of my new freedom. I knew right away. I just knew and let it wash over me until it was done. Frankly, it is making me a bit misty just writing about it.

I’ve had other marathons that were thrilling or satisfying – New York (2007), CIM (2009), Eugene (2010) finishing on Hayward Field and finding I had come third in my age group, but they were not like those first three with their important underlying reasons for being emotional. I suppose I should be honest and admit that emotion can go the other way. My last BMO Vancouver Marathon (May 2014) qualified as a super low. It was all me, not the event, although I’ll admit the weather didn’t help.

Chris Morales at the Reggae Marathon Finish

That Runnin Guy – Reggae Marathon Finish 2009

I said I would stay mostly with my own examples, but my friend Chris Morales (That Runnin’ Guy) has a moving story about his first (and to this point, ONLY marathon). He had powerful personal reasons and motivations to take on the marathon challenge. I am not going to attempt to explain them, but if you want to know more, you can read about it in his own blog post. Because of his heritage he chose the Reggae Marathon for his goal (he was born in Jamaica, but now lives in Toronto). At the left, he is finishing that epic race in 2009. And, if you don’t want to actually go read about it for yourself, you can just trust me that this WAS a very emotional moment for him.

All of this is to point out that running can bring us a lot of soul deep satisfaction if it is significant to the individual. I suppose for runners good enough to challenge the field, it might be a first win. In my case, the second marathon was the completion of a come-back from a physical challenge. That physical issue could be anything depending on the individual. The third marathon finish was emotionally powerful because it marked a huge milestone in my life having nothing at all to do with running, but was just symbolized by finishing that race. I would hope with these examples, many people can relate to something that rings a bell in their own life.

A forest trail on Mount Frosty (Manning Park, BC)

A forest trail on Mount Frosty (Manning Park, BC)

Personally, and I know as I write this that it is likely true for most runners, I find that the circumstances of certain runs, runs not necessarily races or finishes, can lead to highly emotional feelings. As you run a forest trail or through a field or over a mountain on a sunny morning, temperature right, birds singing, you may suddenly be filled with a sense of joy or peace: the feeling that it just doesn’t get any better. You almost don’t want to breathe lest it pass from you, it is that deep. Tell me, if you have been running for any amount of time at all, that this hasn’t happened to you. You can’t make it happen. It just does, but when it does it is deeply emotional.

I was going to qualify the previous point with something like ‘unless you are an absolute beginner, just getting through those early days when everything seems hard’ but realized that completing some of those early runs when you are just starting, can be extremely satisfying, fulfilling and emotional. As a clinic leader I’ve seen it so many times. It happened quite recently when one of my ‘charges’ stated with brightly glittering eyes after a longish training run: “That is the longest I’ve every run!”

Some events might have strong emotional meaning or impact in their own right. There are a few that mean a lot for me. When I am there, doing whatever it may be, it just feels right in an ‘all is right with the world’ kind of way. I feel that way most of the time when on the Hood to Coast Relay. There, it is the people and the oneness of the team as much as anything, but I’ve done other relays and have never felt any of them to be as ‘right’ as Hood to Coast. It’s just me, but that is the point. The event doesn’t matter. The ‘why’ doesn’t matter. Still, the feeling is powerful and IT does matter.

At the Start - 1989  Hood to Coast Relay

At the Start – 1989 Hood to Coast Relay

Speaking of Hood to Coast reminded me of another specific time when the feel-good factor can kick in for a runner. I know that not everyone runs in a competitive way, but I do and so do a lot of others. To be clear, the term competitive does not necessarily mean fast or out to win. It means not being happy unless you are striving to be the best you can, even if the only person you can beat is yourself. Hood to Coast has a rocketing downhill on the very first leg. Since my first time in 1989, Leg #1 has changed only a little. The road has definitely improved and nobody runs it in the dark now. The fastest I’ve run over a sustained distance (5.4 miles) is Leg #1. I came down Mt Hood, in the dark, at an average pace of 5:59/mile (3:42/km). I felt like I was flying. I felt like a ‘winner’. I think for a moment I got an idea of what a really good runner must feel like. As hard as I was running, it felt easy and fluid. Like I said, I was flying! If something like that doesn’t hit you where you live, I kind of feel sorry for you.

"Four Amigos" add to the Reggae Marathon total - now 18 races.

“Four Amigos” add to the Reggae Marathon total – now 18 races.

Sometimes it is the vibe around an event that makes you feel it is ‘just good’, and I don’t mean technically. The Reggae Marathon, Half Marathon & 10K is that way for me. It is the people for sure – see the picture to the right with four friends who met through this event. We span almost 35 years, are of clearly different abilities, come from a wide range of home places not to mention ethnicities and we have gelled as a close group of friends even though most of the rest of the time we are separated by many miles.  But regarding the event, it is more too. I’ve described some of that in other posts about the Reggae Marathon, and it doesn’t matter anyway because it is just a personal perception. If I’ve got you thinking about it, you will probably already be contemplating some event that makes you feel the same way.

Another personal thing is EXCELLENCE. I love to witness excellence happening. Once in a while I even know the person displaying that excellent performance, people like Ellie Greenwood, Dylan Wykes, Rob Watson and Harry Jerome (as a kid, I was in the same track club and trained ‘with’ him). It thrills me to witness the act of taking some aspect of running to a new place. I suppose in a negative way I am pretty emotional about what doping does to the purity of elite performance, even if it is just the doubt factor it creates.

It must be time to wrap this up, if it is going to remain a blog post and not turn into the book mentioned near the beginning. I hope I’ve got across that what causes a deep emotional response or impact varies across a huge spectrum. It is so very personal and while it could be performance based, it need never have to do with performance as such. Completing an event when you weren’t sure or never thought you could, might be the trigger. Coming back from a downturn can be huge. Well, you get the idea.

Maybe, on your next easy run, mull these ideas over and see what comes to you about the emotional side of your running experience.

[Ed Note: Upon review before posting (oh yes, I do review and edit these things) I realized it could easily have a sub-title along the lines of: “Or Why I Will Keep Running Just as Long as I Am Able”]

DOES ANYBODY EVER RUN 5Ks THESE DAYS?

03.16.2015
Probably my most significant 5K Medal

Probably my most significant 5K Medal

Reverse side tells WHY. Inaugural BAA 5K.

Reverse side tells WHY. Inaugural BAA 5K.

The title is a question (or something close to it) that appeared on the Marathon Maniac Facebook page. I think it may have been ‘how many of you run 5Ks’ or something like that. I will admit that the Marathon Maniacs aren’t your average cross-section of runners. They are MARATHON Maniacs. I get some interesting ideas about topics from that page though.

When you spend a lot of your time and money training for and getting to marathons some might not think there is a place for the lowly, perhaps ‘puny’, 5K. Some did feel that way, but I was pleasantly surprised how many extolled the virtues of the 5K, both as a race in itself but also as a powerful tool for improving speed and strength while running our beloved marathons.

The 5K is often the ‘go-to’ distance for charity runs. Nothing wrong with that. With a little slack on the time, most people can cover 5K one way or another and it suits the purpose.  But, it may give the wrong impression regarding what a killer distance the 5K can be. So many people, and not just my Marathon Maniac friends, say things like, “You run marathons. How hard can a 5K be?”  The answer is plenty tough, depending of course on how hard you run. Naturally, if you run 5K at marathon pace it would be pretty easy. The thing is, if you are a serious runner (and that does not necessarily mean blazing fast), you will not be running at marathon pace. You will be running at 5K pace, YOUR 5K pace, but for any given runner, by definition that will be HARD. That pace is different for each person, but sort of like the table of Boston Qualifier marathon times that are all over the map depending on gender and age, if you do your 5K all out, it will be hard! Speaking of the Boston Marathon, I have alas been unable to nail one of those BQ’s (OK, maybe on my first, but that was a long time ago and a long story). Whatever, I’ve never run Boston. I did accompany our daughter Janna when she did it in 2009, so was thrilled to be able to run the Inaugural BAA 5K, held the day before the big event. That is the story behind the photographs at the top of the page.

The 5K is hard physically AND mentally. There is no rest phase (for the weary).  Mentally, you need to be strong and keep the accelerator down. In a half or full marathon there may well be a time when you can back off the absolute edge and catch a little rest. As some people in the Maniac discussion commented, you need to warm up almost as far as the race distance in order to run a 5K well, not to mention actually TRAIN for the distance. Again, in a marathon, for most people, there is no real reason to warm up beyond stretching out your legs. The early part of the race let’s you get into a rhythm and pace zone. No such luxury in a 5K. You’d better be ready to rock it from the gun.

Now, don’t get me wrong. I am not saying that you should or must run a 5K this way, but if you are a serious runner looking for performance in your races, I guess I am. Then there is the elite end of things. Watching the truly fast 5,000m runner shows what speed and endurance is really about. It is nothing short of breath-taking – literally! The World Record for 5,000m on track is an average pace of 2:32/km or just around 4:05/mile. Recall that within my lifetime it was said that if anyone ever ran a mile under four minutes they would die. [Ed. Note: This turned out not to be true at all!]

My competition at the Giants Head Run in June!

My competition at the Giants Head Run in June!

I have run more than one 5K just for fun and I have just committed to another one in June. That one will be with the older of my two grandsons. And, it will be a full circle return to the first race event I ever did as an older runner (older, as in not a teen). It is the Giants Head Run 5K in Summerland, BC. Charlie hasn’t done 5K yet, but is getting there and says he will be ready for June.

I just want to do it with him. He wants to do it with me. Time doesn’t matter. I’ve heard he might be a bit nervous because he knows I’m a long-time runner, which he seems to be confusing with being fast! He loves triathlon and has done a number of ‘mini-tri’ events. His Mom made me promise we’d go easy because like all kids, he might take off like he was only going 100m (and because I’m old?). Could be. We’ll see. Frankly, that ‘start too fast’ trait is hardly reserved for kids, as all runners know all too well! Youngsters develop so fast. He may already be able to whup me if he just paces himself a little.

Hmmmmmm. Go Charlie! Go! Run like the wind!!!  He, he, he,  – atta’ boy!

It reminds me a little of a time when my brother was a teen and working out a bit. He came up from the basement one afternoon and challenged our Dad to arm wrestle.  They struggled a bit and then my brother took the win. Not much was said, but off he went back to the basement (to work out a bit more?).  My Mom scolded my Dad and said, “You really shouldn’t let him win like that!”  My Dad paused and looked at her like only he could do and just replied, “I didn’t.” (Oh, and for the record, my Dad was no push-over.)                         Go Charlie!!  Run!  You can do it!

Actually, there is no reason his Mom and Dad couldn’t run too. Make it a real family affair. Maybe we could have a team shirt! Three generations. I like it!!

[Editor’s Note: Just checked that the GH Run ‘5K’ goes where I thought it did.] Turns out it is actually 5.4K! At least they now declare that right up front. I am quite pleased about the ‘full disclosure’ because with the extra 0.4km I would have been wondering. Now we know.

article-2211641-1548A2EB000005DC-773_634x420Speaking of running 5Ks for fun I was honoured to be asked to run a 5K as part of a local support group when Fauja Singh came to Surrey, BC and ran the Surrey International World Marathon Weekend 5K. You might remember him as the amazing 100 year-old runner who was even doing marathons up to that age. When we ran in Surrey I think he was about 102. Frankly, we were asked to kind of form an ‘invisible protective shield’ around him to make sure he didn’t get bumped or anything. HA! First of all, he ran it in 35 and change and when he saw the finish (and heard the dulcet tones of Mr. Steve King), he picked up the pace. I had to shift gears to keep up! It was a truly inspirational day. He had many family members around him including, I imagine, some great grand-kids. The whole time we were running he was making comments and even if I didn’t understand what he was saying, it seems by the way the people around him kept cracking up, that the old boy was being pretty witty while he clocked off a very respectable 5K.

Getting back to the matter of the 5K as race and off of the 5K as a family affair, it is a fun and demanding distance. Not only that, but as many in the on-line discussion pointed out, it is an integral part of a good marathon training program. Naturally we all run various distances in training for a marathon but some racing will sharpen you for the longer distance. Few can push in training, the way we do in a race. A number of races interspersed in the training schedule will put you in peak form. Some feel that if you are working up to a serious target marathon, a good half marathon a few weeks before will set you up very well. My half marathon PB came just that way, as I trained for what was to be my marathon PB. That said, a couple of short fast races add another dimension to your preparation.

The Marathon Maniacs are an interesting group among which is a crowd who do crazy numbers of marathons, running one every week and some will do a couple of a weekend. That said, and while some Maniacs count hundreds of marathons in their totals, the average is something like 3.25/year. Some just don’t care how long it takes as long as they cross the start and finish and get an official time. Nothing wrong with that. Some appear to be ‘bucket-listers’ that have set a goal to become a MM member and maybe never do another, or certainly not at the pace that you might imagine a Maniac would do. Mixed into this now 11,000 strong crowd are some very fine and competitive runners who take every race and every step very seriously. I am guessing that #1, #2 and #3 (the club founders) can still rip off a 3 hr marathon whenever they please.

So, it was interesting when this discussion of 5Ks started, it seemed like it flushed out a lot of serious runner types because most of the comments swirled around the value of the speed work and how it was great training and prep for serious marathoning. I certainly believe it, even if what I do these days doesn’t look like the work of any kind of speed demon!

Finishing the Canada Day 5K (2014) for an age group podium place.

Finishing the White Rock Canada Day 5K (2014) for an age group podium place.

One of the personal issues I have (and maybe others of my vintage) with racing shorter distances – 5K, 8K and 10K primarily, is that pushing that hard (training and racing) tends to bring on injuries. Running for endurance also has its challenges for me, but I am far less prone to injury. Even though family members are promoting that I should shorten my racing distances, I am not quite there yet. Fewer marathons? Yes, I can see that. Zero marathons?  I’m not sure. Not yet. After a really bad one at Vancouver last May and a pretty good one (for me) at Salt Lake City in September, I thought maybe it would be good to let the Big Cottonwood Marathon be my 25th (it was) and final marathon. That MAY be how it does turn out, but some new projects have been popping up in my head and as long as the last marathon I do is a great experience, I am feeling OK to go on for a bit. What is a great experience? Either a good ‘pure’ performance or a very satisfying event where I did not necessarily run for time but rather the experience.

Will 5K races be part of that? You can bet your booties (or racing flats) on that! Will the 5K be a satisfying and serious race for me in the future? It sure will! Hey, now that I’m in a new age group, if I choose races carefully, I might even win a few (age group), or at least place.

WHAT TO DO? WHAT TO DO?

03.13.2015
March 11/15  "Pirate" at the 'Puter'.

March 11/15 “Pirate” at the ‘Puter’.

First off, as long as I have this patch/shield on, I’m allowed to talk like a pirate! So mateys be warned, ahaaar.

You may ask yourself: “But why does he have the patch?”

The answer is that I just got my new ‘bionic’ eye. That kind of sounds better than just saying I had cataract surgery. I think so anyway. I opted for a lens that is supposed to correct most of my other vision issues. Once I get the other eye done in the Summer, it is highly probable that I will not need glasses. Maybe for reading, but otherwise, no. As a runner (semi-blind runner who really needs to wear glasses all the time) I am thrilled at the idea of not having to wear glasses when I run, or alternately to get myself some good sport sun-glasses for when I need them. For those who don’t know, regular glasses are not made to really stay in place when your face starts getting sweaty. I don’t have nearly enough money to afford good prescription sport sun-glasses.

Speaking of not having enough money, I sadly had to forego the X-Ray vision option. OK, so there is no such thing at the moment and even if there was I don’t have any other super powers anyway. I mean, at this point the only locomotives that I’m faster than are ones sitting in museum displays. As for the leaping over tall buildings, I don’t run trails because I trip over roots and rocks. OK, OK, you got me but I was never faster than a speeding bullet nor more powerful than a locomotive, so I kind of combined those two. Call it poetic license.

The big challenge it seems, is that I can’t run (sweat really, so no substitute exercise either) for two or maybe three weeks – TWICE. The other eye is scheduled for July and we will have to do the whole thing again then. This will be a bit of a struggle as I have some running goals including the BMO Vancouver Half Marathon followed by the Eugene Half a week later. Then, I am signed on for the Big Cottonwood Half Marathon in Utah in mid-September. I feel that I’m in decent shape as I now hit ‘pause’ and can pick it up sufficiently in the time between my return to activity and the first race (Vancouver on May 3). We’ll see how it goes, but Vancouver might wind up being a good hard training race with Eugene as the one I will do for performance. I will try to do the same thing re Big Cottonwood. Train and run well leading up to the down-time for the other eye, then pick up again in the several weeks prior to Big Cottonwood.

Having the cataracts looked after is more important in the long run than the races I may miss or have to run easy. Everyone I know who has had this procedure done raves about it. Since I’m writing this only hours after the first operation, I am still struggling a bit with one fairly dilated pupil and a kind of ‘fog’ in the eye with the new lens. That said, it is already clear that I can see so much better with that eye (no glasses) haziness notwithstanding. I’m told it will take a day or two for the vision to clear completely. It was amazingly painless with just a bit of an annoying ‘scratchiness’ or irritated feeling at the moment.

[A day or two later, OK, two days later.] What a treat! The ‘new’ eye is seeing better than it has in decades at 20/25. Apparently things are going along pretty well. I have one more visit to the surgeon and then I think other than the recovery phase, this one is done.

March 13/15  One lens glasses. No pirate look.

March 13/15 One lens glasses. No pirate look.

I’m still wearing the shield at night to protect myself from rubbing the eye in my sleep. The only one it seems to be bothering is my wife who finds all that pirate talking to be quite annoying when she is trying to sleep. As I sit here typing, I have busted the left lens out of my computer glasses which is so much better than trying to ignore the fact I can’t see out of my right eye without glasses, OR putting up with the mess of having to try to use my new eye to look through the prescription. Looks a little silly maybe, but nobody is going to see me. The rest of the time when I’m just walking around and not doing anything ‘close’, I am finding that the new improved left eye works best when I don’t wear glasses and let it just dominate the right eye. Again, better than fighting with the prescription on the left side. Can’t do the same trick with my regular glasses (removing one lens) as I still need the reading part.

I guess if I cant run or use any sweat inducing gym gear, writing may pass the time. Thanks for helping with that by reading this.

If I ever had any doubt about the tales of wonder I have heard from others who have had this procedure, I sure don’t now. The procedure was amazingly fast, taking only about 10 minutes of actual work on my eye. I arrived at the hospital out-patient facility at 7:20am and was home at 9:30am.  I must admit that the clerk who checked me in gave me a little thrill when she said, “Daniel Cumming, cataract surgery, right eye.”  Now I know I need to get the right one done, but the lens to be inserted has a prescription built into it.  YIKES

Anyway, it was OK and I must have been asked my name and what I was there for and which eye, about a dozen times!  The last time was just before the ‘cutting’ started, when the surgeon said, “Will you please tell everyone here your full name and what you are here for?” I did and away we went.

I’m sure the various, and multiple, drops going in my eye included some anaesthetics but the whole thing was painless and I was totally awake and aware at all times. To my surprise there were no diabolical torture-like devices to secure my head. There was a depression in the ‘pillow’ under my head and the rest of the stabilizing, the doctor did with his free hand.

Since I can see and compute and not much else, I have been surfing around upcoming races and planning my return to running and competing. I mean, I haven’t run my first race as a M70-74 competitor as yet.  The first one for which I AM registered is the Vancouver Half, but the Sun Run is a possibility. We’ll see what happens later. Get it?  We’ll SEE!

START ‘EM YOUNG AT A RACE THAT CARES!

03.04.2015

And, by young, I mean shortly after conception!

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Resting after the ordeal!

No, I have not completely jumped the tracks. This is a true and fun story about our brand new grandson, Jonah. The whole family is pretty crazy about  running (and about Jonah at this particular moment in time), even if I am the only one ‘certifiable’ where it comes to the running (Marathon Maniac #6837). Our daughter Janna is the current top performer within our ‘clan’ where it comes to speed.  Although, since she is also Jonah’s Mom, she is on a bit of a hiatus for the moment. That said, the last race she ran was the Winnipeg Police Service Half Marathon. She did OK too, considering that she was kind of in the morning sickness phase of her pregnancy (21/153 in her age group, 338/1578 OA and in a time of 1:50:42).

Truth be told, she is probably not the only woman ever to run a race while ‘in the family way’. Still, I was impressed and decided as a fairly nutso runner that even if he was doing a ‘ride-along’ (hey, it was the Police Service race) Jonah was a finisher just like his Mom. Finishers get a finisher medal. A plan was hatched!

I contacted the Winnipeg Police Service Half Marathon officials and told them my story and asked if it was remotely possible to obtain a finisher medal from the 2014 event. They saw the story like I did and got right into it! They  sent me the medal I requested AND a wonderful pink plush pig for Jonah (which will likely be more appreciated by him in the short-term, than the medal). I had the wonderful opportunity to make the surprise presentation of the medal and official race pig when we arrived in Winnipeg to meet our newest family member! To say it was well received may just a bit of an understatement.

There is more to the story, but I want to stop right here and say how much we all appreciate this fabulous gesture from a race that really gets it. I’m not from Winnipeg and even if we did live in Morden, MB for a couple of years,  have never run this race. But, I am sure that any event that cares enough to help me out with my personal fun project, is a race to be run. Since we are going to be making regular visits to Winnipeg, it is sure on my ‘to do’ list to run the race. I mean, our daughter and grandson have done it, and I’m pretty sure our son-in-law ran it a couple of years ago. Maybe one day not too long from now, we can all do one of the events together. It won’t be this year as I am already committed to the BMO Vancouver Half Marathon on the same day, but I’d sure recommend the Winnipeg Police Service Half Marathon, Relay and 5K to anyone who is looking for a good event to do.

The 2015 Version is  on May 3 and will also include a 5K this time around. The 5K is a new addition to open the event to more people. It is all part of moving into the second decade of the event (2014 was the 10th running of the race). With the half marathon plus a two leg team-relay event and now the 5K, there is pretty much something for everyone where it comes to distance, 5K, 10K (sort of) and 21.1K.

Back to Jonah’s big debut race. I am given to understand that in due course, he will be receiving his finisher certificate and also understand he MAY have won the ‘under nine months’ category! Let’s face it, we had to wait until we knew his name before a certificate could be made. OK, I admit that winning the under 9 months category  may be a bit like me winning some races in the 70+ category (just not that much competition). But hey, it already gives us something in common!

There is a new family running project in the works. With any luck, sometime before too long,

Jonah and his Grandad

Jonah and his Grandad

Jonah and his Dad and Mom, our other grandson Charlie (he will be nine years old this summer), his Mom and Dad, the Grandad (that would be me) and the Nana will all be able to enter the same race and do it together! Why, we might even convince Uncle Cameron to come out of retirement for this! Charlie says he is up for a 5K and while Jonah seems enthusiastic enough (OK, so it might have been  gas that made him smile when I asked what he thought), he will probably have to take part in a baby jogger. The big trick is going to be getting everybody in the same place at the same time because we are scattered all over the place from Victoria to Winnipeg. If we can do it, you KNOW there will be a team shirt!

When I started writing this, we were actually in Winnipeg, meeting the newest family member! The morning when this photo was taken he was having a visit with his Grandad. I thought I was entertaining him with my witty commentary, but he fell asleep right there in my arms. Next thing though, his little legs started to go – I’m pretty sure he was having a running dream!!